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#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int c1;
    char op;
    printf("\n(Int or Float) \n\t[1.for int  2.for float] \nEnter Choise : ");
    scanf("%d",&c1);

    if (c1==1)
    {
        printf("\n(select opearion) \n\t[+, -, *] \nEnter Choise : ");
        scanf("%c", &op);

        int a,b,r;
        printf("\n Enter Two no. : ");
        scanf("%d%d ", &a,&b);

        switch (op)
        { 
        case '+': r=a+b;
            break;
        case '-': r=a-b;
            break;
        case '*': r=a*b;
            break;
        default:
            printf("Wrong Operator Entered");   
        }
        printf("\n\n Result = %d \n\n",r);
    }
    else if(c1==2)
    {
        printf("\n(select opearion) \n\t[+, -, *] \nEnter Choise : ");
        scanf("%c", &op);

        float a,b,r;
        printf("\n Enter two numbers : ");
        scanf("%f%f", &a,&b);

        switch (op)
        { 
        case '+': r=a+b;
            break;
        case '-': r=a-b;
            break;
        case '*': r=a*b;
            break;
        default:
            printf("Wrong Operator Entered");   
        }
        printf("\n\n Result = %f\n\n",r);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("\n\n Wrong choise entered \n\n");
    }
}

Upon running this program the program does not wait for taking the value of op and directly goes to the asking for Entering Two no. Why does this happen?

Why does the program skips part of taking values from the user of desired operation and goes to the next step of asking for two no.s on which the operation is to be performed. Why does the program skips that value taking part.

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What exactly do you input? –  chris Sep 4 '12 at 7:10
10  
@Deepak Why do you not format your question properly, and never accept an answer? –  sashoalm Sep 4 '12 at 7:12
    
"Upon running this program..." - And this has to do with the compiler not stopping for anything, because...? –  Christian Rau Sep 4 '12 at 7:24
    
@satuon Are you sure it's homework? –  Christian Rau Sep 4 '12 at 7:26
    
It is nothing to do with the compiler not stopping; the compiler stopped when it finished building your code. It is your code that is not stopping. –  Clifford Sep 4 '12 at 7:45
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

After the first scanf(), there's a newline character left in input buffer which is consumed by the next scanf. So, it doesn't wait for input.

Use getchar() after the 1st call to scanf to consume the newline character.

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1  
That only works for "normal" input; it is not robust in the case of a mistype or deliberate attempt to cause failure. For example if "123#\n" were entered (easy to do on a UK keyboard where # is next to Enter), calling getchar() alone would be insufficient –  Clifford Sep 4 '12 at 7:40
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scanf is probably the least user friendly way ever of getting input from users. It works OK (more or less) for fixed format files, but for interactive input I would not touch it with a bargepole.

The first scanf to read the number terminates on the first non-digit and leaves that for the next scanf to read. The first non digit is the newline you very probably entered.

And so that's what you get for op.

Your best bet is probably to use getline to read an entire line of user input on that and use sscanf on that (or strtoul if you want to validate the input a bit).

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The console device associated with stdin is normally line buffered, so scanf() does not return until a complete line is available. However the %d conversion specifier only consumes digit characters leaving the newline (and any non digit characters you might type) in the buffer, so the next scanf call returns immediately but does not perform a conversion.

You would also have a problem if you never entered any digit characters and just pressed "Enter".

You should do two things:

  1. Check the return value of scanf() to check for a valid conversion.
  2. Flush the line buffer of all remaining characters up-to and including the newline.

For example:

int scanf_check ;

...

// Accept valid input
do
{
    scanf_check = scanf("%d",&c1);

} while( scanf_check != 0 )

while( getchar() != '\n' ) { /* do nothing */ } // Flush the line

When using %c a slightly different idiom is required; the conversion check is unnecessary since all characters can be read with %c, however if teh input id "empty", there will still be a newline, so:

scanf("%c", &op);
while( op != '\n' && getchar() != '\n' ) { /* do nothing */ } // Flush the line

If op is already newline, short-circuit evaluation of && will occur and getchar() will not be called, otherwise getchar() is called as before until the end of the input is found.

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