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I was creating a <div> tag in which I wanted to apply two classes for a <div> tag which would be a thumbnail gallery. One class for its position and the other class for its style. This way I could apply the style, I was having some strange results which brought me to a question.

Can two classes be assigned to a <div> tag? If so, which one overrules the other one or which one has priority?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Multiple classes can be assigned to a div. Just separate them in the class name with spaces like this:

<div class="rule1 rule2 rule3">Content</div>

CSS rules are applied in the order they are encountered and if there is a conflict between two rules, then CSS specificity determines which rule takes precedence. If the CSS specificity is the same for two rules, then the later one (the one defined later in the page) takes precedence.

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+1 Another great link explaining CSS specificity: maxdesign.com.au/articles/css-cascade –  Fabian Barney Sep 4 '12 at 7:44
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If you asking about they have same property then as per the CSS rule it's take the last statement.

<div class="red green"></div>

CSS

.red{
 color:red;
}
.green{
 color:green;
}

As per the above example it's take the last statement as per css tree which is .green.

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The class that is defined last in the CSS have priority, if nothing else applies.

Read up on CSS priority to see how it works.

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Many classes can be assigned to an element, you just separate them with a space

<div class="myClass aSecondClass keepOnClassing stayClassySanDiego"></div>

Because of the cascade in CSS, the overwriting rules closest the to bottom of the document will be applied to the element.

So if you have

.myClass
{
    background: white;
    color: blue;
}

.keepOnClassing
{
    color: red;
}

The red color will be used, but not the background color as it was not overwritten.

You must also take into account CSS specificity, if you have a more specific selector, this one will be used:

.myClass
{
    background: white;
    color: blue;
}

div.myClass.keepOnClassing
{
    background: purple;
    color: red;
}

.stayClassySanDiego
{
    background: black;
}

The second selector here will be used as it is more specific.

You can take a look at it all here.

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