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I want to count new elements that weren't present in previous years. In the example

Sample data:

var1 <- list('2003' = 1:3, '2004' = c(4:3), '2005' = c(6,4,1), '2006' = 1:4 )

I would like to get the output

newcount <- list('2003' = 0, '2004' = 1, '2005' = 1, '2006' = 0)

Unsuccessful code:

newcount <- mapply(setdiff, var1, seq_along(var1), function(i) 
            {if (i > 1) {Reduce(union, var1[i-1], accumulate=T)}}, length)
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2  
Please study the terminology. You have a list of vectors, not data frames. –  Andrie Sep 4 '12 at 8:01
    
Thanks @Andrie, fixed. –  dmvianna Sep 4 '12 at 8:04
1  
diff( sapply( Reduce(union, var1, accumulate = TRUE) ,length)) #[1] 1 1 0 –  BondedDust Sep 4 '12 at 20:09
    
@DWin, this would be my chosen solution if you had made it an answer rather than a comment. Very neat, very readable! –  dmvianna Sep 4 '12 at 23:28
    
James' solution was where I got the idea. I just trimmed his a bit. Didn't seem right to add it as an answer. –  BondedDust Sep 4 '12 at 23:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Almost there, but its better to use vector indexing to work with the offset and add the always-known initial element afterwards:

lapply(c(list(`2003`=integer(0)),
       mapply(setdiff,var1[-1], 
              Reduce(union,var1,accumulate=TRUE)[-length(var1)])),length)
$`2003`
[1] 0

$`2004`
[1] 1

$`2005`
[1] 1

$`2006`
[1] 0
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Where you going for the maximum number of function calls in a single line with that one? ;-) (Seriously though, that is massive overkill.) –  Gavin Simpson Sep 4 '12 at 8:20
    
Well, 80 characters is so passé ;) –  James Sep 4 '12 at 8:23

Assuming that var1 is sorted according to year, and that for 2003 you'd like 3 instead of 1, you could try

newcount <- lapply(seq_along(var1),function(x){
  prev<-unlist(var1[seq_len(x-1)])
# Improvement suggested by plannapus
  sum(!var1[[x]]%in%prev) # length(which(!var1[[x]]%in%prev))
})

names(newcount)<-names(var1)

newcount
# $`2003`
# [1] 3

# $`2004`
# [1] 1

# $`2005`
# [1] 1

# $`2006`
# [1] 0

OK, if you're absolutely sure that 2003 should be 0 (which I see as an exception to your logic), then you could do the following:

newcount <- c(0, lapply(seq_along(var1)[-1],function(x){
  prev<-unlist(var1[seq_len(x-1)])
  sum(!var1[[x]]%in%prev)
}))
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1  
+1. I think length(which(!var1[[x]]%in%prev)) can be shortened in sum(!var1[[x]]%in%prev) though. –  plannapus Sep 4 '12 at 8:30
    
@plannapus, Good suggestion. Changed above. –  BenBarnes Sep 4 '12 at 8:37
    
Also, there are no previous years for 2003 so it should be 0 if we are counting number of things found in previous years? –  Gavin Simpson Sep 4 '12 at 9:32
1  
@GavinSimpson, thanks for the comment. I think the OP wanted the number of elements in year i that were not present in any previous year. So although I can understand having 0 for 2003, it seems to be an exception to the rule. It'd be an easy change, but a "hard code". –  BenBarnes Sep 4 '12 at 9:38
    
Yeah, just work over 2:length(var1) and hard code the 0. The OP's expected output is pretty clear –  Gavin Simpson Sep 4 '12 at 9:40

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