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This question already has an answer here:

I have this code in a file

class Sudoku(dict):
    COLUMNS = [
        {(x, y) for y in xrange(9)} for x in xrange(9)
    ]

When I run python broken.py, I get the traceback:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "U:\broken.py", line 1, in <module>
    class Sudoku(dict):
  File "U:\broken.py", line 3, in Sudoku
    {(x, y) for y in xrange(9)} for x in xrange(9)
  File "U:\broken.py", line 3, in <setcomp>
    {(x, y) for y in xrange(9)} for x in xrange(9)
NameError: global name 'x' is not defined
[Finished in 0.1s with exit code 1]

I don't really see the problem here. Isn't x defined in the comprehension?


What's stranger is how this seems to execute without an error when pasted directly into the python interpreter...


EDIT: This works if I use a list comprehension rather than a set comprehension

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marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters python Jan 14 '15 at 17:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Just to make it clear: could you give the exact expected output? I'm just wondering if that's exactly what you want or if will you perform some more magic later. – Michał Górny Sep 4 '12 at 8:27
    
@MichałGórny Any non-error output would be good here... – Eric Sep 4 '12 at 8:28
1  
It works fine on Python 3.2 (replacing xrange with range). It looks like a 2.7 bug (in set comprehensions backport). – Paolo Moretti Sep 4 '12 at 8:41
1  
Actually, using a 2.7 interpreter, it breaks as well. Make sure you include the full class definition, not just the line with the comprehension. The problem obviously is that the local variable x doesn't get transported into the short-hand set comprehension. I'd file it as a bug; see what happens. – Evert Sep 4 '12 at 9:13
3  
This was a bug now resolved, update your python version. Issue 11796. – mg. Sep 4 '12 at 9:31
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I've filed a bug here. This is still broken by design in python 2.7.5.

From the bug report:

In Python 2, list comprehensions don't have their own scope, so the x in your initial example lives at class scope. However, the set comprehension does have its own scope. By design, a variable defined at class scope is not visible to inner scopes inside that class.

In Python 3, this works because the list comprehension has its own scope.

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Wild guess, but Python set comprehensions were introduced with Python 2.7 and 3.0: would you happen to use an older version to execute your script, and a recent one as your interpreter ?


After looking at this section of the Python documentation, I see no explanation for this behavior. Furthermore, the fact that it works with list comprehension clearly show that it is not a scope issue.

I see only two possible reasons:

  • A bug in the set comprehensions implementation
  • The use of an anterior Python version which does not support set comprehensions.
share|improve this answer

I'm afraid I have no idea why your code is not working, however, the following works and gives you what you want:

class Sudoku(dict):
    COLUMNS = [
        set([(x, y) for y in xrange(9)]) for x in xrange(9)
    ]

Maybe some of the python gurus on this site can enlighten us as to why your code snippet fails.

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I wish I could give a theoretical explanation, but this works:

class Sudoku(dict):
    def __init__(self):
        self.COLUMNS = [
            {(x, y) for y in xrange(9)} for x in xrange(9)
            ]

if __name__ == "__main__":
    s = Sudoku()
    print s.COLUMNS
share|improve this answer
1  
i may be talking out of my a$$, but perhaps trying to define COLUMNS as a static member of the class makes the set comprehension loose scope and check for x in the global variables list (which does not make sense to me anyway you look at it). Perhaps report as a bug? – omu_negru Sep 4 '12 at 9:39

Maybe this it what you really want:

[[{x:y} for x in xrange(9)] for y in xrange(9)]
share|improve this answer
3  
There is nothing "apriori" wrong with the OP's set comprehension. If you cut it and paste it into an interpreter, it gives the expected answer. – Pascal Bugnion Sep 4 '12 at 8:29
1  
My interpreter raised a SyntaxError, thats why I thought there is something else wrong. So I posted this answer, which works on my machine. Then I found out that it is just because I'm still using 2.6 :) – MaxPowers Sep 4 '12 at 8:51

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