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Consider this code:

public class MyClass()
{
  public MyClass()
  {    
  }

  public DoSomething()
  {
    using (var service = new CustomerCreditServiceClient())
    {
       var creditLimit = service.GetCreditLimit(
         customer.Firstname, customer.Surname, customer.DateOfBirth);       
    }
  }
}

We now want to refactor it to loosely couple it. We end up with this:

public class MyClass()
{
  private readonly ICustomerCreditService service;

  public MyClass(ICustomerCreditService service)
  {
     this.service= service;
  }

  public DoSomething()
  {
     var creditLimit = service.GetCreditLimit(
       customer.Firstname, customer.Surname, customer.DateOfBirth);       
  }
}

Looks ok right? Now any implementation can use the interface and all is good.

What if I now say that the implementation is a WCF class and that the using statement before the refactoring was done was there for a reason. ie/to close the WCF connection.

So now our interface has to implement a Dispose method call or we use a factory interface to get the implementation and put a using statement around that.

To me (although new to the subject) this seems like a leaky abstraction. We are having to put method calls in our code just for the sake of the way the implementation is handling stuff.

Could someone help me understand this and confirm whether I'm right or wrong.

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
You can make your interface inherit from Dispose –  Thomas Levesque Sep 4 '12 at 8:29
    
True or implement its own Dispose. Either way, having to call Dispose is leaky isnt it? –  Jon Sep 4 '12 at 8:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, it is a leaky abstraction when you let ICustomerCreditService implement IDisposable, since you've now written ICustomerCreditService with a specific implementation in mind. Further more, this communicates to the consumer of that interface that it could dispose that service, which might not be correct, especially since in general, a resource should be disposed by the one who creates it (who has the ownership). When you inject a resource into a class (using constructor injection for instance), it is not clear if the consumer is given the ownership.

So in general the one responsible of creating that resource should dispose it.

However, in your case, you can simply prevent this from even happening by implementing a non-disposable implementation of ICustomerCreditServiceClient that simply creates and disposes the WCF client within the same method call. This makes everything much easier:

public class WcfCustomerCreditServiceClient
    : ICustomerCreditServiceClient
{
    public CreditLimit GetCreditLimit(Customer customer)
    {
        using (var service = new CustomerCreditServiceClient())
        {
            return service.GetCreditLimit(customer.Firstname,
                customer.Surname, customer.DateOfBirth);       
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea. The only thing I would say there is that there is another level of abstraction but that might not be a bad thing per se –  Jon Sep 4 '12 at 8:50
    
@Jon: There is no new level of abstraction. You already defined that ICustomerCreditServiceClient abstraction. The difference is that your WCF proxy doesn't implement it, but no new abstractions where added. Doing things like this prevents you from complicating you IoC configuration. –  Steven Sep 4 '12 at 8:52
    
Maybe my terminiology is wrong. I meant another level, so MyClass calls WcfCustomerCreditServiceClient which calls CustomerCreditServiceClient –  Jon Sep 4 '12 at 8:54
1  
If this is the only function called on that interface this was also my first idea. However, when there is not only one call to the interface but several (withing then original using-block), then this might become slow, as every call connects and disconnects... –  FrankB Sep 4 '12 at 9:05
1  
@FrankB: That's true. When the performance gets a problem, you will need to move the scope up of the resource. One step up is to use a factory (as you wrote in your answer). Next step up is to let the DI/IoC container dispose it. For instance, when running in a web environment, you can register it as a 'per web request' lifestyle, which means only one instance is created during the lifetime of a single web request. If you're not running in a web environment, you'd probably need some scoping, as Dennis Traub explains. –  Steven Sep 4 '12 at 9:12

You should call the Dispose of the ICustomerCreditService where it has been instantiated as MyClass now has no idea of the lifecycle of ICustomerCreditService.

share|improve this answer
    
But this will all be done with an IOC container so you'd need to specify something with that. I think Ninject allows you to call a dispose on a dependency implementation when you configure it –  Jon Sep 4 '12 at 8:37

Yes, it is. But that’s a necessary evil. The very existence of the IDisposable interface is a leaky abstraction. Leaky abstractions are simply an everyday fact of programming. Avoid them where possible but don’t fret when you can’t – they are ubiquitous anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, dont agree... –  FrankB Sep 4 '12 at 8:58
    
I don't agree either. –  Steven Sep 4 '12 at 8:59
    
@FrankB Uhm … could you elaborate? After all, this isn’t an opinion with which to agree or disagree, it’s a fact – facts can’t be disagreed with, only their evaluation. If you think I’ve made a mistake in the facts or their evaluation then please tell me so and I’ll correct that. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 4 '12 at 10:01
    
@Steven Same for you. See previous comment. Incidentally, I’ve seen your answer just now, and this is indeed a non-leaky way to handle this particular case. My answer was more general though. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 4 '12 at 10:02
    
@KonradRudolph IDisposable is there exactly to be non-leaky. If you mean that it is easy to do it wrong; then yes, that's bad. But thats not IDisposables fault... It is a clean way of keeping unmanaged stuff under control. btw: You did not elaborate on what makes it leaky? –  FrankB Sep 4 '12 at 10:32

Starting again with the first implementation, I would try to add a getInterface-Request to the Class, so that the implementation could stay more or less the same. Then it can safely call Dispose (effectively it only defers the creation of the interface implementation, but stays in control of its life cycle): (c#-code not verified...)

public class MyClass()
{
  public delegate ICustomerCreditService InterfaceGetter;
  private InterfceGetter getInterface;
  public MyClass(InterfaceGetter iget)
  {
    getInterface = iget;
  }
  public DoSomething()
  {
    using (var customerCreditService = getInterface())
    {
       var creditLimit = customerCreditService.GetCreditLimit(customer.Firstname, customer.Surname, customer.DateOfBirth);       
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I find your answer a bit vague, but you're basically advising to inject a factory that allows creating that instance (+1 for that). In general, factories are good, since it is clear that the caller gets the ownership of the instance created, and it is clear it needs to dispose that instance. You'll still need to implement IDisposable on the ICustomerCreditService though, which is not needed in this case. –  Steven Sep 4 '12 at 9:03
    
@Steven thanks for clarifying a littel and see my comment to your answer... –  FrankB Sep 4 '12 at 9:12

You should handle the lifecycle of the customerCreditService in the calling code. How should MyClass know if the service is still needed by the caller? If caller is responsible for cleaning up its resources then MyClass doesn't need to be disposable.

// calling method

using (var service = new CustomerCreditServiceClient()) {
    var myClass = new MyClass(service);
    myClass.DoSomething();
}

Update: In the comments OP mentioned the use of an IoC like Ninject. The code then could look like this:

IKernel kernel = ...;

using (var block = kernel.BeginBlock())
{
    var service = block.Get<ICustomerCreditService>();
    var myClass = new MyClass(service);
    myClass.DoSomething();
}

The kernel.BeginBlock() creates an activation block. It makes sure that the resolved instances are disposed when the block ends.

share|improve this answer
    
But this will all be done with an IOC container so you'd need to specify something with that. I think Ninject allows you to call a dispose on a dependency implementation when you configure it –  Jon Sep 4 '12 at 8:37
    
Then you can have the IoC container resolve and dispose of the CustomerCreditServiceClient. There still is no need to implement IDisposable.Dispose() in MyClass. –  Dennis Traub Sep 4 '12 at 8:41
    
You would not pass the the kernel around like that –  Jon Sep 4 '12 at 8:48
    
This is just a simplified example. You never mentioned an IoC container in the first place and I just tried to extend my answer according to your comment. Please update your question if the use of a container is so important. OTOH: Using an IoC container is considered an anti-pattern itself. –  Dennis Traub Sep 4 '12 at 8:50
    
Using an IOC container is an anti-pattern??? –  Jon Sep 4 '12 at 8:53

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