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C# string reference type?

Say, I have a string called

string sample = "Initial value";

After passing to a method test()

public static void Test(string testString)
{
    testString = "Modified Value";
}

If i print 'sample' after passing Test(sample), I except it should print "Modified Value".

But its printing "Initial Value". Why is that case if string is reference type?

But the same (expected logic), working for object. can someone please clear me?

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marked as duplicate by Habib, Simon P Stevens, KooKiz, Marc Gravell Sep 4 '12 at 9:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
sorry Raj, your question does not make any sense, provide more code or add some details to your question –  Karel Frajtak Sep 4 '12 at 9:09
    
Thanks Steve, I will try my level best to get the accept rate. I'm new to stack overflow (previously i just read the solutions only) but now started to actively using it. :) –  VIRA Sep 4 '12 at 9:17
    
Darren Davies, Habib, SMK, - Sorry to give you answer in one shot. I have already read all those questions but possibly i'm unable to get any answer to it. Thats why raised it again across million of users may be those questions raised less that number of users now. –  VIRA Sep 4 '12 at 9:20

3 Answers 3

This has nothing to do with string being a reference type. This is because the parameter is passed by value, not by reference.

If you modify your method like this, so that the parameter is passed by reference:

public static void Test(ref string testString)
{
    testString = "Modified Value";
}

Then sample will be modified.

See this article for more details about parameter passing.

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2  
@downvoter, care to explain? –  Thomas Levesque Sep 4 '12 at 9:17
1  
+1 to counter the down vote –  Habib Sep 4 '12 at 11:58

That's because of way how CLR passes the params to method.

Put simply:

string sample = "Initial value";  

Here sample variable refers to "Initial value" string instance stored in heap.

public static void Test(string testString) 
{ 
    testString = "Modified Value"; 
}

In the method you modify testString variable(copy of sample variable) making it references to "Modified Value" string in a heap, leaving original sample variable no affected.

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2  
ok, -1, what did I write wrong? –  alex.b Sep 4 '12 at 9:21
1  
When leaving down votes please leave a comment or down votes are pointless. –  Mr Gray Sep 4 '12 at 9:23

System.String is immutable. Changing a string actually creates a new string object, leaving the old object untouched.

see here: Is string a value type or a reference type?

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2  
It's true, but it's not the reason why sample is not modified... –  Thomas Levesque Sep 4 '12 at 9:12
2  
This particular instance doesn't have anything to do with immutability, but rather simply reassigning the parameter reference value. –  Adam Houldsworth Sep 4 '12 at 9:13
    
Thomas is correct, how immutable plays here? Anyway its modifying data. But i need answer for why its modified after passing to some method and manipulating it? –  VIRA Sep 4 '12 at 9:21
2  
i was wrong, immutability isn't the key here. Thomas was right, passing by value is the reason your string isn't modified. By assigning a new value to the string in your method, you are acutally creating a new string object (thats why i first thought immutability was the key). But outside your method, your sample variable still references the old string object. –  Dirk Trilsbeek Sep 4 '12 at 9:39
    
@DirkTrilsbeek in that case why keep this wrong answer around? Delete it and save your future reps –  nawfal Dec 8 '12 at 14:04

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