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I've been googling this problem since yesterday and to no avail;

When I loop through a number of files in one directory, and process the rows of each file within that loop, I always close, but it seems as though python is opening all the files in the same memory space, so when I loop through a file I retrieve all the records from the previously opened files, it's as if they're in a pointer array. . . .wtf?

    import os
    import sys
    import glob
    import string
    import cPickle
    path2 = './'
    columnShuffleTable = loadColumnTable('myTable') #func previously defined
    codeScrambleTable = loadScrambleTable('theirTable') #func previously defined
    pathToFiles2 = glob.glob(os.path.join(path2, '*.DAT'))

    for curFile in pathToFiles2:    
        _list = ['',] 
        #this is the variable with which I'm having a problem
        unscrambledCodes = file(curFile[-10:], 'r') 
        #this always yields the actual first line of the file at which I am currently at
        line = unscrambledCodes.readline() 
        _list[0] = '|' + line.strip() #stripping trailing spaces
        #the list length at this point always equates to '1', so up to here everything is great
        print "list length:", len(_list) 
        # this always reads the 2nd line of the very first file I loaded. . .wtf?
        line = unscrambledCodes.readline().strip() 

        while(line):
            #for unscrambledCodes [my input file] 
            print "len list: ", len(_list), "infile", unscrambledCodes 
            nextLine = unscrambledCodes.readline().strip()

            if not nextLine:
                _list.append('|' + line)
                break
            else:
                _list.append( '|' + line[:-14] + scrambleCode(line[-12:], columnShuffleTable, codeScrambleTable))
            #end if

            line = nextLine
        unscrambledCodes.close()
        outfile = open(curFile[-10:-4] + '.Scrambled', 'w')
        output = '\n'.join(_list)
        outfile.write(output)
        outfile.close()

as requested, here are my i/o samples:

input file1:
AB00007737106517 COSTCLASSU275
C000000010031932155750539976333693187714
C000000010031932155750539976105307608239

file2:
AB00007736638744 COSTCLASSU275
C000000010030284907699012480608351468369
C000000020030284907699012480751885101503

file3:
AB00007737148207 COSTCLASSU275
C000000010032271716759259098738354718484
C000000020032271716759259098394986919513

desired output file1:
AB00007737148207 COSTCLASSU275
|C000000010031932155750539976079292077121
|C000000010031932155750539976126217711213

file2:
AB00007736638744 COSTCLASSU275
|C000000010030284907699012480968864628712
|C000000020030284907699012480294550195814

file3:
AB00007737106517 COSTCLASSU275
|C000000010032271716759259098216262704445
|C000000020032271716759259098085462231948

current output file1:
AB00007737148207 COSTCLASSU275
|C000000010031932155750539976079292077121
|C000000010031932155750539976126217711213

file2:
AB00007736638744 COSTCLASSU275
|C000000010031932155750539976079292077121
|C000000010031932155750539976126217711213
.
.
.
|C000000010030284907699012480968864628712
|C000000020030284907699012480294550195814
file3:
AB00007737106517 COSTCLASSU275
|C000000010031932155750539976079292077121
|C000000010031932155750539976126217711213
.
.
.
|C000000010030284907699012480968864628712
|C000000020030284907699012480294550195814
.
.
.
|C000000010032271716759259098216262704445
|C000000020032271716759259098085462231948

share|improve this question
    
This seems like the kind of thing which with statements were designed for. I.e. Grab a list of all the filenames, and open each one inside a with statement... –  Andy Hayden Sep 4 '12 at 9:26
1  
As written I don't see why unscrambledCodes wouldn't do the right thing for the second readline(). Perhaps showing some of the actual output, and what you expected would help clarify what the actual problem is? –  jszakmeister Sep 4 '12 at 9:30
    
@jszakmeister you have no idea how I want to do that, but the data is so sensitive I'd get fired :-(, probably get sent to court also –  pythonian29033 Sep 4 '12 at 10:04
    
@pyruva you could try and make an example you could share (three files with foo's and bar's with numbers). I really doubt that the problem is where you see it. –  Lev Levitsky Sep 4 '12 at 10:39

2 Answers 2

Yes, the unscrambledCodes.readline() will read one line of the file at a time, incrementing to the next row until the whole file is read in.

You can use something like:

content = unscrambledCodes.readlines()

Which will read each line into an array. Then you can iterate through the content, and update the lines as you wish.

Also, instead of file(), I generally use

myFile = open('filename.txt','r')
content = myFile.readlines()
myFile.close()
share|improve this answer
    
I only changed that to file() this morning, they're both failing, as well as your solution, sorry –  pythonian29033 Sep 4 '12 at 10:05
    
I'm not sure if I understand the issue correctly. Is it when you set output = '\n'.join(_list) that _list includes items from previous iterations? –  Sam Mirrado Sep 5 '12 at 8:19
    
Hi Sam, no, as soon as i went int the while loop, previous records started coming out of the line var –  pythonian29033 Sep 11 '12 at 14:34

the general consensus is to use open instead of file. I'd start with that.

Second, try to do a generator comprehension on your opened file as it is much easier (the next method will return a newline) as new_file=[x.strip() for x in unscrambledCodes)] , then do whatever other operations you have to , like new_file=["|"+line for line in new_file[:-1]] and new_file[-1]=......

Also as someone else above pointed out , you might wanna try the with keyword (even though it will bring another level of indentation) like

with open("....","r") as in_file, open("...","w") as out_file:

`'''.... do your stuff'''`
share|improve this answer
    
changed to file this morning to see if that might change anything. . .it isn't –  pythonian29033 Sep 4 '12 at 10:06
    
thanks for the with thing, I think I tried it last night but to no avail. . .no harm in trying it again though. I'll tell you what happens –  pythonian29033 Sep 4 '12 at 10:13

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