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I have declared a static const int variable in one driver and exported that variable symbol. In another driver i am modifying that variable. The other driver prints the modified value but the original driver retains the original value. When both virtual and physical addresses of the variable as seen by both drivers are same, how is this even possible. Is it a kernel bug?

[root@localhost bug]# uname -a
Linux localhost.localdomain 3.5.3 #3 SMP Mon Sep 3 21:52:12 IST 2012
i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux

[root@localhost bug]# cat driver.c

#include <linux/module.h>

static const int value = 123;

int init_module()
{
        printk("Base driver (init): value                     = %d\n", value);
        printk("Base driver (init): virtual address of value  = %p\n", (void *)&value);
        printk("Base driver (init): physical address of value = %p\n", (void
*)__pa(&value));
        return 0;
}

void cleanup_module()
{
        printk("Base driver (exit): value                     = %d\n", value);
        printk("Base driver (exit): virtual address of value  = %p\n", (void *)&value);
        printk("Base driver (exit): physical address of value = %p\n", (void
*)__pa(&value));
}
EXPORT_SYMBOL(value);

[root@localhost bug]# cat hacker.c

#include <linux/module.h>

extern int value;

int init_module()
{
        value = 987;
        printk("Hacker driver (init): value                     = %d\n", value);
        printk("Hacker Base driver (init): virtual address of value  = %p\n",
(void *)&value);
        printk("Hacker Base driver (init): physical address of value = %p\n",
(void *)__pa(&value));
        return 0;
}

void cleanup_module()
{
        printk("Hacker driver (exit): value                     = %d\n", value);
        printk("Hacker driver (exit): virtual address of value  = %p\n",
(void *)&value);
        printk("Hacker driver (exit): physical address of value = %p\n",
(void *)__pa(&value));
        return;
}


[root@localhost bug]# insmod driver.ko

Base driver (init): value = 123 Base driver (init): virtual address of value = f89d61c8 Base driver (init): physical address of value = 389d61c8

[root@localhost bug]# insmod hacker.ko

Hacker driver (init): value = 987 Hacker Base driver (init): virtual address of value = f89d61c8 Hacker Base driver (init): physical address of value = 389d61c8

[root@localhost bug]# rmmod hacker.ko

Hacker driver (exit): value = 987 Hacker driver (exit): virtual address of value = f89d61c8 Hacker driver (exit): physical address of value = 389d61c8

[root@localhost bug]# rmmod driver.ko

Base driver (exit): value = 123 Base driver (exit): virtual address of value = f89d61c8 Base driver (exit): physical address of value = 389d61c8

[root@localhost bug]# cat /proc/kallsyms | grep value

f89f91c8 R value [driver] f89f9088 r __ksymtab_value [driver] f89f91cc r __kstrtab_value [driver]

Interestingly, when i change the declaration of variable to "volatile" in driver.c as "static const volatile int" then the driver.ko prints modified value "987" during rmmod and the original value "123" is lost. What is the difference between this and previous declaration?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That has nothing to do with the kernel. That is basic C behavior. Once you declare a variable const, the compiler is free to inline the value that you assigned to it anywhere it is accessed in the same compilation unit. Taking a pointer to a const variable forces the compiler to also add a copy of the variable in the data section, assuming it is read-only.

If you run objdump -d one the result kernel module and look at init_module, you would see that in the parameter being passed to printk, it is not really accessing the variable, but uses an inline copy of the value.

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yes correct, i did objdump and checked that the gcc optimises the const value and puts it directly. Thanks –  Manav Sep 5 '12 at 5:16

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