Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm compiling a program which was originally build in Visual C# 2005. I'am using visual C# 2010. And I keep getting "NullReference Execption was unhandled" errors when running the program on the following functions: The error occurs on the line with DataBuffer. DataBuffer is an private string set to null on initialisation.

if (DataBuffer.Contains(ok)) 
            {
                okFound = true;
            }

and

    string temp = getLine(DataBuffer.Substring(mylocation));
    if (!checkTypeFound())
    {
        if (temp != null)
        {
            parseDeviceType(temp);
        }
        checkTypeFound();
    }

When I check what the value of DataBuffer is in the code above (when I get the error) this is not null. It actually contains the data I expect. DataBuffer information is loaded in this function:

private void ser1_DataReceived(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
{
    while (ser1.BytesToRead > 0)
    {
        string data = ser1.ReadExisting();
        DataBuffer += data;
    }
}

The serial port is opened somewhere else in the code. There have been no changes to the code only the compiler is different. What line should I add, and where to solve this error? Note, I can prevent this error from happening using an if and try-catch statement. But this is not what I'm looking for, I need this code to work. This application has not been changed in any way other than the compiler.

share|improve this question
2  
You've shown snippets of code, but you've given no indication of why you'd expect DataBuffer to be non-null by the time you reach the first snippet. –  Jon Skeet Sep 4 '12 at 10:08
    
Does this error actually happen during compilation? or at runtime? What is DataBuffer, and when is it assigned a value? –  Marc Gravell Sep 4 '12 at 10:08
    
On another note: concatenating stings repeatedly is a bit of a faux-pas - should really use StringBuilder –  Marc Gravell Sep 4 '12 at 10:10
    
@ShellShock not true; you are allowed to concatenate strings where either or both is null –  Marc Gravell Sep 4 '12 at 10:12
    
You can try and assign the string to string.Empty and try the code is it gives the same exception. –  Shakti Prakash Singh Sep 4 '12 at 11:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should check if DataBuffer is null before you call its methods.

if (DataBuffer != null && DataBuffer.Contains(ok)) 
{
    okFound = true;
}

// or simpler:
okFound = (DataBuffer != null && DataBuffer.Contains(ok));

and your second code snipped should check for null as well.

string temp = String.Empty;

if (DataBuffer != null)
    temp = getLine(DataBuffer.Substring(mylocation));

if (!checkTypeFound())
{
    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(temp))
        parseDeviceType(temp);

    checkTypeFound();
}
share|improve this answer

Try using the following:

if (DataBuffer != null && DataBuffer.Contains(ok)) 
{
   okFound = true;
}
share|improve this answer

You should set the value of DataBuffer to something other than null in your constructor. If you can't do that then you may set it to string.Empty instead of null to avoid null exception. But it always better to check for null before initiating an instance method on object.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.