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I am not sure I fully understand the idea behind Dependency Injection in general, and using Guice in particular.

I have quite big swing application, and I would like to introduce guice, to decouple this app. Assuming I have injector in main class

Guice.createInjector(new BindingModule());
Application app = injector.getInstance(Application.class);
app.run();

And it works. If I have some field, let say JPanel, in Application class, annotated with @Inject then it is injected. But if in I manually create something in Application constructor than JTree from example will not be injected (assuming everything is configured properly).

class Application {

          @Inject JPanel mainPanel //this will be injected

          JPanel otherPanel;


          public Application() {
              otherPanel = new MyNewPanel();

              mainPanel.add(otherPanel);
          }

}  

class MyNewPanel extends JPanel { 


          @Inject JTree tree;  //this will not be injected

          public MyNewPanel() {

               add(tree);
          }

}

My question is, do I need to have all injected objects in control of guice to be injected. I can not break the control, like I did with otherPanel.

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2 Answers 2

In the Dependency Injection paradigm, all injected objects must be in control of the injection container, that's the only way the container can actually inject an instance of an object into an injection point (@Inject annotated).

When you instantiate object instances using the new operator, then that object instance is out of the control of the injection container (it was created by you, not the container). So, even though you have injection points in that new object instance, the container isn't aware of them and thus it can't inject any injection candidate into the injection points of that object instance (because, as I already said, it is out of its control).

So, answering with a few words: Yes, you need to have all objects under the control of the container (Guice) if you want them to be injected automatically. Any hack that you might come up to get injection working the way you mean in your question would be breaking the rules of Inversion of Control.

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If you want to or have to use new you can use providers guice providers or ondemand injection guice injections. `Injector injector = Guice.createInjector(...);

MyNewPanel myNewPanel = new MyNewPanel();
injector.injectMembers(myNewPanel);`

Your code above can be slightly rewritten to use standard injection.

class Application {

      final JPanel mainPanel;

      final JPanel otherPanel;


      @Inject
      public Application( @Named("main") JPanel mainPanel, @Named("other") JPanel otherPanel) {
          this.otherPanel = otherPanel;
          this.mainPanel = mainPanel;
          mainPanel.add(otherPanel);             
      }

}  

class MyNewPanel extends JPanel { 


      @Inject JTree tree;  

      public MyNewPanel() {

           add(tree);
      }

}

As you have two different Panels injected you have you distinguish them via Naming, i.e. bind them with annotatedWith

binder.bind( JPanel.class ).annotatedWith( Names.named( "other" ).to( MyNewPanel.class );

Or you use MyNewPanel in the Application constructor. But that is somewhat less decoupled.

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