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Do you know the purpose of (^|\s) in the following expression?

/(^|\s)(apple|orange|lemon)(\s|$)/.test(foo);
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@Tina: I have checked and not sure about it so i asked here... –  Ricky Sep 4 '12 at 10:18
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@TinaCGHoehr Don't be offensive please. From that sense every second question must be referenced to Google. –  VisioN Sep 4 '12 at 10:19
    
I believe that would make this site a better place –  Tina CG Hoehr Sep 4 '12 at 10:21
    
@TinaCGHoehr Not for those who are learning. I understand your feelings when you 100% know the answer while someone doesn't have enough passion (or time) to find the solution. In the current question I see a small complication of (^|\s) syntax that for sure might not be understandable for beginners. Regex is quite a hard topic. –  VisioN Sep 4 '12 at 10:24
    
OK, I apologize for hurting anybody's feelings. If anyone wants their downvotes removed please edit their Q/A (any small edit will do, I think). –  Tina CG Hoehr Sep 4 '12 at 10:25
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

(^|\s) matches the start of the string or a whitespace character.

So it will match if the string says "apple it is", or if it says "I want an apple".

Do note that in the first case, it will match "apple ", and in the second case it matches " apple".

Notice the extra space matched. If that behaviour is not desired, then a word boundary should be used instead (given by \b).

Eg:

/\b(apple|orange|lemon)\b/

That would allow all apples matched to match "apple" exactly (instead of " apple " or other variants).

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Means either start of string (^) or a space character (\s).

So it should match in the following cases: "apple", " apple".

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This is not equivalent. For example, it will fail for "one apple". –  ColBeseder Sep 4 '12 at 10:27
    
@ColBeseder Yes, that's right. Maybe it's better not to search for equivalents :) –  VisioN Sep 4 '12 at 10:32
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it means that the regex matches the start of the string (^) or (|) something else (the rest of your regex) that starts with a space (\s)

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