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Is there a clean, preferably standard method of trimming leading and trailing whitespace from a string in C? I'd roll my own, but I would think this is a common problem with an equally common solution.

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25 Answers 25

up vote 60 down vote accepted

If you can modify the string:

// Note: This function returns a pointer to a substring of the original string.
// If the given string was allocated dynamically, the caller must not overwrite
// that pointer with the returned value, since the original pointer must be
// deallocated using the same allocator with which it was allocated.  The return
// value must NOT be deallocated using free() etc.
char *trimwhitespace(char *str)
{
  char *end;

  // Trim leading space
  while(isspace(*str)) str++;

  if(*str == 0)  // All spaces?
    return str;

  // Trim trailing space
  end = str + strlen(str) - 1;
  while(end > str && isspace(*end)) end--;

  // Write new null terminator
  *(end+1) = 0;

  return str;
}

If you can't modify the string, then you can use basically the same method:

// Stores the trimmed input string into the given output buffer, which must be
// large enough to store the result.  If it is too small, the output is
// truncated.
size_t trimwhitespace(char *out, size_t len, const char *str)
{
  if(len == 0)
    return 0;

  const char *end;
  size_t out_size;

  // Trim leading space
  while(isspace(*str)) str++;

  if(*str == 0)  // All spaces?
  {
    *out = 0;
    return 1;
  }

  // Trim trailing space
  end = str + strlen(str) - 1;
  while(end > str && isspace(*end)) end--;
  end++;

  // Set output size to minimum of trimmed string length and buffer size minus 1
  out_size = (end - str) < len-1 ? (end - str) : len-1;

  // Copy trimmed string and add null terminator
  memcpy(out, str, out_size);
  out[out_size] = 0;

  return out_size;
}
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12  
You should mention that you have to keep a copy of the original pointer in the first example when the string is malloc'ed, or you will never be able to free it again. –  jkramer Sep 23 '08 at 20:30
4  
Sorry, the first answer isn't good at all unless you don't care about memory leaks. You now have two overlapping strings (the original, which has it's trailing spaces trimmed, and the new one). Only the original string can be freed, but if you do, the second one points to freed memory. –  David Nehme Nov 6 '08 at 15:11
1  
@Adam: Please modify the first function. Its not freeing the memory! –  N 1.1 Mar 16 '10 at 10:56
9  
@nvl: No. str is a local variable, and changing it does not change the original pointer being passed in. Function calls in C are always pass-by-value, never pass-by-reference. –  Adam Rosenfield Mar 17 '10 at 18:32
2  
@Raj: There's nothing inherently wrong with returning a different address from the one that was passed in. There's no requirement here that the returned value be a valid argument of the free() function. Quite the opposite -- I designed this to avoid the need for memory allocation for efficiency. If the passed in address was allocated dynamically, then the caller is still responsible for freeing that memory, and the caller needs to be sure not to overwrite that value with the value returned here. –  Adam Rosenfield Jun 13 '13 at 20:54

Here's one that shifts the string into the first position of your buffer. You might want this behavior so that if you dynamically allocated the string, you can still free it on the same pointer that trim() returns:

char *trim(char *str)
{
    size_t len = 0;
    char *frontp = str;
    char *endp = NULL;

    if( str == NULL ) { return NULL; }
    if( str[0] == '\0' ) { return str; }

    len = strlen(str);
    endp = str + len;

    /* Move the front and back pointers to address the first non-whitespace
     * characters from each end.
     */
    while( isspace(*frontp) ) { ++frontp; }
    if( endp != frontp )
    {
        while( isspace(*(--endp)) && endp != frontp ) {}
    }

    if( str + len - 1 != endp )
            *(endp + 1) = '\0';
    else if( frontp != str &&  endp == frontp )
            *str = '\0';

    /* Shift the string so that it starts at str so that if it's dynamically
     * allocated, we can still free it on the returned pointer.  Note the reuse
     * of endp to mean the front of the string buffer now.
     */
    endp = str;
    if( frontp != str )
    {
            while( *frontp ) { *endp++ = *frontp++; }
            *endp = '\0';
    }


    return str;
}

Test for correctness:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *sample_strings[] =
    {
            "nothing to trim",
            "    trim the front",
            "trim the back     ",
            " trim one char front and back ",
            " trim one char front",
            "trim one char back ",
            "                   ",
            " ",
            "a",
            "",
            NULL
    };
    char test_buffer[64];
    int index;

    for( index = 0; sample_strings[index] != NULL; ++index )
    {
            strcpy( test_buffer, sample_strings[index] );
            printf("[%s] -> [%s]\n", sample_strings[index],
                                     trim(test_buffer));
    }

    /* The test prints the following:
    [nothing to trim] -> [nothing to trim]
    [    trim the front] -> [trim the front]
    [trim the back     ] -> [trim the back]
    [ trim one char front and back ] -> [trim one char front and back]
    [ trim one char front] -> [trim one char front]
    [trim one char back ] -> [trim one char back]
    [                   ] -> []
    [ ] -> []
    [a] -> [a]
    [] -> []
    */

    return 0;
}

Source file was trim.c. Compiled with 'cc trim.c -o trim'.

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Please, review: in case str = "\r\n", the loop while(isspace(*(--endp)) && endp != frontp) will incorrectly scan endp below s! –  jose.angel.jimenez Sep 13 at 13:18
    
@jose.angel.jimenez: Thanks! I fixed that along with the undefined behavior when initializing frontp. –  indiv Sep 13 at 19:47

My solution. String must be changeable. The advantage above some of the other solutions that it moves the non-space part to the beginning so you can keep using the old pointer, in case you have to free() it later.

void trim(char * s) {
    char * p = s;
    int l = strlen(p);

    while(isspace(p[l - 1])) p[--l] = 0;
    while(* p && isspace(* p)) ++p, --l;

    memmove(s, p, l + 1);
}

This version creates a copy of the string with strndup() instead of editing it in place. strndup() requires _GNU_SOURCE, so maybe you need to make your own strndup() with malloc() and strncpy().

char * trim(char * s) {
    int l = strlen(s);

    while(isspace(s[l - 1])) --l;
    while(* s && isspace(* s)) ++s, --l;

    return strndup(s, l);
}
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1  
trim() invokes UB if s is "" as the first isspace() call would be isspace(p[-1]) and p[-1] does not necessarily reference a legal location. –  chux Nov 6 '13 at 16:39

Here is my attempt at a simple, yet correct in-place trim function.

void trim(char *str)
{
    int i;
    int begin = 0;
    int end = strlen(str) - 1;

    while (isspace(str[begin]))
        begin++;

    while ((end >= begin) && isspace(str[end]))
        end--;

    // Shift all characters back to the start of the string array.
    for (i = begin; i <= end; i++)
        str[i - begin] = str[i];

    str[i - begin] = '\0'; // Null terminate string.
}
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1  
Suggest changing to while ((end >= begin) && isspace(str[end])) to prevent UB when str is "". Prevents str[-1]`. –  chux Nov 6 '13 at 16:43
    
Nice one! thanks :) –  Joe DF Apr 2 at 0:42

Here's a solution similar to @adam-rosenfields in-place modification routine but without needlessly resorting to strlen(). Like @jkramer, the string is left-adjusted within the buffer so you can free the same pointer. Not optimal for large strings since it does not use memmove. Includes the ++/-- operators that @jfm3 mentions. FCTX-based unit tests included.

#include <ctype.h>

void trim(char * const a)
{
    char *p = a, *q = a;
    while (isspace(*q))            ++q;
    while (*q)                     *p++ = *q++;
    *p = '\0';
    while (p > a && isspace(*--p)) *p = '\0';
}

/* See http://fctx.wildbearsoftware.com/ */
#include "fct.h"

FCT_BGN()
{
    FCT_QTEST_BGN(trim)
    {
        { char s[] = "";      trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("",    s); } // Trivial
        { char s[] = "   ";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("",    s); } // Trivial
        { char s[] = "\t";    trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("",    s); } // Trivial
        { char s[] = "a";     trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a",   s); } // NOP
        { char s[] = "abc";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("abc", s); } // NOP
        { char s[] = "  a";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a",   s); } // Leading
        { char s[] = "  a c"; trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a c", s); } // Leading
        { char s[] = "a  ";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a",   s); } // Trailing
        { char s[] = "a c  "; trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a c", s); } // Trailing
        { char s[] = " a ";   trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a",   s); } // Both
        { char s[] = " a c "; trim(s); fct_chk_eq_str("a c", s); } // Both

        // Villemoes pointed out an edge case that corrupted memory.  Thank you.
        // http://stackoverflow.com/questions/122616/#comment23332594_4505533
        {
          char s[] = "a     ";       // Buffer with whitespace before s + 2
          trim(s + 2);               // Trim "    " containing only whitespace
          fct_chk_eq_str("", s + 2); // Ensure correct result from the trim
          fct_chk_eq_str("a ", s);   // Ensure preceding buffer not mutated
        }

        // doukremt suggested I investigate this test case but
        // did not indicate the specific behavior that was objectionable.
        // http://stackoverflow.com/posts/comments/33571430
        {
          char s[] = "         foobar";  // Shifted across whitespace
          trim(s);                       // Trim
          fct_chk_eq_str("foobar", s);   // Leading string is correct

          // Here is what the algorithm produces:
          char r[16] = { 'f', 'o', 'o', 'b', 'a', 'r', '\0', ' ',                     
                         ' ', 'f', 'o', 'o', 'b', 'a', 'r', '\0'};
          fct_chk_eq_int(0, memcmp(s, r, sizeof(s)));
        }
    }
    FCT_QTEST_END();
}
FCT_END();
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This solution is downright dangerous! If the original string does not contain any non-whitespace characters, the last line of trim happily overwrites whatever precedes a, if those bytes happen to contain 'whitespace' bytes. Compile this without optimizations and see what happens to y: unsigned x = 0x20202020; char s[4] = " "; unsigned y = 0x20202020; printf("&x,&s,&y = %p,%p,%p\n", &x, &s, &y); printf("x, [s], y = %08x, [%s], %08x\n", x, s, y); trim_whitespace(s); printf("x, [s], y = %08x, [%s], %08x\n", x, s, y); –  Villemoes Apr 30 '13 at 11:40
    
@Villemoes, thank you for the bug report. I've updated the logic to avoid walking off the left side of the buffer when the string contains only whitespace. Does this new version address your concerns? –  Rhys Ulerich Apr 30 '13 at 17:20
    
Language lawyers would probably shout at you for the mere thought of speculating about creating a pointer to the char preceding the one 'a' points to (which is what your '--p' will do). In the real world, you're probably ok. But you can also just change '>=' to '>' and move the decrement of p to 'isspace(*--p)'. –  Villemoes May 2 '13 at 12:42
    
I think the lawyers would be okay as it's just comparing an address without touching it, but I do like your suggestion on the decrement too. I've updated it accordingly. Thanks. –  Rhys Ulerich May 2 '13 at 16:35
    
The algorithm is wrong. Try stripping " foobar" and see what happens. –  doukremt Mar 2 at 11:42

Here's my C mini library for trimming left, right, both, all, in place and separate, and trimming a set of specified characters (or white space by default).

contents of strlib.h:

#ifndef STRLIB_H_
enum strtrim_mode_t {
    STRLIB_MODE_ALL       = 0, 
    STRLIB_MODE_RIGHT     = 0x01, 
    STRLIB_MODE_LEFT      = 0x02, 
    STRLIB_MODE_BOTH      = 0x03
};

char *strcpytrim(char *d, // destination
                 char *s, // source
                 int mode,
                 char *delim
                 );

char *strtriml(char *d, char *s);
char *strtrimr(char *d, char *s);
char *strtrim(char *d, char *s); 
char *strkill(char *d, char *s);

char *triml(char *s);
char *trimr(char *s);
char *trim(char *s);
char *kill(char *s);
#endif

contents of strlib.c:

#include <strlib.h>

char *strcpytrim(char *d, // destination
                 char *s, // source
                 int mode,
                 char *delim
                 ) {
    char *o = d; // save orig
    char *e = 0; // end space ptr.
    char dtab[256] = {0};
    if (!s || !d) return 0;

    if (!delim) delim = " \t\n\f";
    while (*delim) 
        dtab[*delim++] = 1;

    while ( (*d = *s++) != 0 ) { 
        if (!dtab[0xFF & (unsigned int)*d]) { // Not a match char
            e = 0;       // Reset end pointer
        } else {
            if (!e) e = d;  // Found first match.

            if ( mode == STRLIB_MODE_ALL || ((mode != STRLIB_MODE_RIGHT) && (d == o)) ) 
                continue;
        }
        d++;
    }
    if (mode != STRLIB_MODE_LEFT && e) { // for everything but trim_left, delete trailing matches.
        *e = 0;
    }
    return o;
}

// perhaps these could be inlined in strlib.h
char *strtriml(char *d, char *s) { return strcpytrim(d, s, STRLIB_MODE_LEFT, 0); }
char *strtrimr(char *d, char *s) { return strcpytrim(d, s, STRLIB_MODE_RIGHT, 0); }
char *strtrim(char *d, char *s) { return strcpytrim(d, s, STRLIB_MODE_BOTH, 0); }
char *strkill(char *d, char *s) { return strcpytrim(d, s, STRLIB_MODE_ALL, 0); }

char *triml(char *s) { return strcpytrim(s, s, STRLIB_MODE_LEFT, 0); }
char *trimr(char *s) { return strcpytrim(s, s, STRLIB_MODE_RIGHT, 0); }
char *trim(char *s) { return strcpytrim(s, s, STRLIB_MODE_BOTH, 0); }
char *kill(char *s) { return strcpytrim(s, s, STRLIB_MODE_ALL, 0); }

The one main routine does it all. It trims in place if src == dst, otherwise, it works like the strcpy routines. It trims a set of characters specified in the string delim, or white space if null. It trims left, right, both, and all (like tr). There is not much to it, and it iterates over the string only once. Some folks might complain that trim right starts on the left, however, no strlen is needed which starts on the left anyway. (One way or another you have to get to the end of the string for right trims, so you might as well do the work as you go.) There may be arguments to be made about pipelining and cache sizes and such -- who knows. Since the solution works from left to right and iterates only once, it can be expanded to work on streams as well. Limitations: it does not work on unicode strings.

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I upvoted this and I know its old but I think there's a bug. dtab[*d] does not cast *d to unsigned int before using it as an array index. On a system with signed char this will read up to dtab[-127] which will cause bugs and possibly crash. –  Zan Lynx Dec 12 '13 at 1:20
#include "stdafx.h"
#include "malloc.h"
#include "string.h"

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

  char *ptr = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char)*30);
  strcpy(ptr,"            Hel  lo    wo           rl   d G    eo rocks!!!    by shahil    sucks b i          g       tim           e");

  int i = 0, j = 0;

  while(ptr[j]!='\0')
  {

      if(ptr[j] == ' ' )
      {
          j++;
          ptr[i] = ptr[j];
      }
      else
      {
          i++;
          j++;
          ptr[i] = ptr[j];
      }
  }


  printf("\noutput-%s\n",ptr);
        return 0;
}
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This made me laugh because I thought dreamlax had edited the test string to include "sucks big time". Nope. The original author is just honest. –  James Morris Jun 15 '10 at 7:28

s was so extremely helpful, I wanted to say I was glad this post was available and to show what I was able to do with the examples. I needed to tokenize a larger string, and then take the substring(s) and find the last one - so I could remove a newline from fgets() call, and also remove the whitespace from the front of that token -- so I could easily compare it with a static string. The first example in the post above got me there, so thank you. Here is how I used the code samples and the output I got.

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
   FILE * fp;   // test file
   char currDBSStatstr[100] = {"/0"};
   char *beg;
   char *end;
   char *str1;
   char str[] = "Initializing DBS Configuration";
   fp = fopen("file2-1.txt","r");
   if (fp != NULL)
   {
      printf("File exists.\n");
      fgets(currDBSStatstr, sizeof(currDBSStatstr), fp);
   }
   else
   {
      printf("Error.\n");
      exit(2);
   }  
   //print string
   printf("String: %s\n", currDBSStatstr);
   //extract first string
   str1 = strtok(currDBSStatstr, ":-");
   //print first token
   printf("%s\n", str1);
   //get more tokens in sequence
   while(1)
   {
      //extract more tokens in sequence
      str1 = strtok(NULL, ":-");
      //check to see if done
      if (str1 == NULL)
      {
         printf("Tokenizing Done.\n");
         exit(0);
      }
      //print string after tokenizing Done
      printf("%s\n", str1);
      end = str1 + strlen(str1) - 1;
      while((end > str1) && (*end == '\n'))
      {
         end--;
         *(end+1) = 0;
         beg = str1;
         while(isspace(*str1))
            str1++;
      }
      printf("%s\n", str1);
      if (strcmp(str, str1) == 0)
         printf("Strings are equal.\n");
   }
   return 0;

}

Output

File exists.

String: DBS State: DBS Startup - Initializing DBS Configuration

DBS State

DBS Startup

DBS Startup

Initializing DBS Configuration

Initializing DBS Configuration

Strings are equal.

Tokenizing Done.

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A bit late to the game, but I'll throw my routines into the fray. They're probably not the most absolute efficient, but I believe they're correct and they're simple (with rtrim() pushing the complexity envelope):

#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

/*
    Public domain implementations of in-place string trim functions

    Michael Burr
    michael.burr@nth-element.com
    2010
*/

char* ltrim(char* s) 
{
    char* newstart = s;

    while (isspace( *newstart)) {
        ++newstart;
    }

    // newstart points to first non-whitespace char (which might be '\0')
    memmove( s, newstart, strlen( newstart) + 1); // don't forget to move the '\0' terminator

    return s;
}


char* rtrim( char* s)
{
    char* end = s + strlen( s);

    // find the last non-whitespace character
    while ((end != s) && isspace( *(end-1))) {
            --end;
    }

    // at this point either (end == s) and s is either empty or all whitespace
    //      so it needs to be made empty, or
    //      end points just past the last non-whitespace character (it might point
    //      at the '\0' terminator, in which case there's no problem writing
    //      another there).    
    *end = '\0';

    return s;
}

char*  trim( char* s)
{
    return rtrim( ltrim( s));
}
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These functions will modify the original buffer, so if dynamically allocated, the original pointer can be freed.

#include <string.h>

void rstrip(char *string)
{
  int l;
  if (!string)
    return;
  l = strlen(string) - 1;
  while (isspace(string[l]) && l >= 0)
    string[l--] = 0;
}

void lstrip(char *string)
{
  int i, l;
  if (!string)
    return;
  l = strlen(string);
  while (isspace(string[(i = 0)]))
    while(i++ < l)
      string[i-1] = string[i];
}

void strip(char *string)
{
  lstrip(string);
  rstrip(string);
}
share|improve this answer

Another one, with one line doing the real job:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
   const char *target = "   haha   ";
   char buf[256];
   sscanf(target, "%s", buf); // Trimming on both sides occurs here
   printf("<%s>\n", buf);
}
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Its trivial with a regex library, so how "pure" C are we talking?

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2  
That'd work great, but adding a regex library would be a bit overkill, especially when one isn't already included in the project in question. –  coledot Sep 23 '08 at 18:04

Personally, I'd roll my own. You can use strtok, but you need to take care with doing so (particularly if you're removing leading characters) that you know what memory is what.

Getting rid of trailing spaces is easy, and pretty safe, as you can just put a 0 in over the top of the last space, counting back from the end. Getting rid of leading spaces means moving things around. If you want to do it in place (probably sensible) you can just keep shifting everything back one character until there's no leading space. Or, to be more efficient, you could find the index of the first non-space character, and shift everything back by that number. Or, you could just use a pointer to the first non-space character (but then you need to be careful in the same way as you do with strtok).

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3  
strtok is generally not a very good tool to use - not least because it is not re-entrant. If you stay inside a single function, it can be used safely, but if there's any possibility of threads or calling other functions which might themselves use strtok, you are in trouble. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '08 at 18:48

Here is a function to do what you want. It should take care of degenerate cases where the string is all whitespace. You must pass in an output buffer and the length of the buffer, which means that you have to pass in a buffer that you allocate.

void str_trim(char *output, const char *text, int32 max_len)
{
    int32 i, j, length;
    length = strlen(text);

    if (max_len < 0) {
        max_len = length + 1;
    }

    for (i=0; i<length; i++) {
        if ( (text[i] != ' ') && (text[i] != '\t') && (text[i] != '\n') && (text[i] != '\r')) {
            break;
        }
    }

    if (i == length) {
        // handle lines that are all whitespace
        output[0] = 0;
        return;
    }

    for (j=length-1; j>=0; j--) {
        if ( (text[j] != ' ') && (text[j] != '\t') && (text[j] != '\n') && (text[j] != '\r')) {
            break;
        }
    }

    length = j + 1 - i;
    strncpy(output, text + i, length);
    output[length] = 0;
}

The if statements in the loops can probably be replaced with isspace(text[i]) or isspace(text[j]) to make the lines a little easier to read. I think that I had them set this way because there were some characters that I didn't want to test for, but it looks like I'm covering all whitespace now :-)

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1  
The maxlen < 0 test leads to dangerous behaviour. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '08 at 18:53
    
hmm...good point. I'll have to fix my code. Thanks for noting that. –  Mark Sep 23 '08 at 19:27

I'm not sure what you consider "painless."

C strings are pretty painful. We can find the first non-whitespace character position trivially:

while (isspace(* p)) p++;

We can find the last non-whitespace character position with two similar trivial moves:

while (* q) q++;
do { q--; } while (isspace(* q));

(I have spared you the pain of using the * and ++ operators at the same time.)

The question now is what do you do with this? The datatype at hand isn't really a big robust abstract String that is easy to think about, but instead really barely any more than an array of storage bytes. Lacking a robust data type, it is impossible to write a function that will do the same as PHperytonby's chomp function. What would such a function in C return?

share|improve this answer
    
This work well unless the string is made up of all white-spaces. Need a one time check before do { q--; } ... to know *q != 0. –  chux Nov 7 at 5:07

I'm only including code because the code posted so far seems suboptimal (and I don't have the rep to comment yet.)

void inplace_trim(char* s)
{
    int start, end = strlen(s);
    for (start = 0; s[start] && isspace(s[start]); ++start) {}
    if (s[start]) {
        while (end > 0 && isspace(s[end-1]))
            --end;
    }
    memmove(s, &s[start], end - start);
    s[end - start] = '\0';
}

char* copy_trim(const char* s)
{
    int start, end;
    for (start = 0; s[start] && isspace(s[start]); ++start) {}
    if (s[start] == '\0') return strdup("");
    for (end = strlen(s); end > 0 && isspace(s[end-1]); --end) {}
    return strndup(s + start, end - start);
}

strndup() is a GNU extension. If you don't have it or something equivalent, roll your own. For example:

r = strdup(s + start);
r[end-start] = '\0';
share|improve this answer

Update: As @Mark Ransom noted in comments - this breaks when whitespace occurs inside the string. Me bad. Sorry.

Using strspn and strcspn (shamelessly borrowing from @Adam Rosenfield, and assuming that you know what "whitespace" is)

const char *WHITESPACE=" \t\n\r";

char *trimwhitespace(char *str)
{
  int spacesAtStart = strspn(str, WHITESPACE);
  char *result = str + spacesAtStart;
  int lengthOfNonSpace = strcspn(result, WHITESPACE);
  result[lengthOfNonSpace] = 0;
  return result;
}
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2  
This doesn't work if there is whitespace in the middle of the string. I almost submitted a similar solution myself before realizing the error. –  Mark Ransom Sep 23 '08 at 19:38
1  
oops. I'll try to downvote it. –  Arkadiy Sep 23 '08 at 20:45

Use a string library, for instance:

Ustr *s1 = USTR1(\7, " 12345 ");

ustr_sc_trim_cstr(&s1, " ");
assert(ustr_cmp_cstr_eq(s1, "12345"));

...as you say this is a "common" problem, yes you need to include a #include or so and it's not included in libc but don't go inventing your own hack job storing random pointers and size_t's that way only leads to buffer overflows.

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Most of the answers so far do one of the following:

  1. Backtrack at the end of the string (i.e. find the end of the string and then seek backwards until a non-space character is found,) or
  2. Call strlen() first, making a second pass through the whole string.

This version makes only one pass and does not backtrack. Hence it may perform better than the others, though only if it is common to have hundreds of trailing spaces (which is not unusual when dealing with the output of a SQL query.)

static char const WHITESPACE[] = " \t\n\r";

static void get_trim_bounds(char  const *s,
                            char const **firstWord,
                            char const **trailingSpace)
{
    char const *lastWord;
    *firstWord = lastWord = s + strspn(s, WHITESPACE);
    do
    {
        *trailingSpace = lastWord + strcspn(lastWord, WHITESPACE);
        lastWord = *trailingSpace + strspn(*trailingSpace, WHITESPACE);
    }
    while (*lastWord != '\0');
}

char *copy_trim(char const *s)
{
    char const *firstWord, *trailingSpace;
    char *result;
    size_t newLength;

    get_trim_bounds(s, &firstWord, &trailingSpace);
    newLength = trailingSpace - firstWord;

    result = malloc(newLength + 1);
    memcpy(result, firstWord, newLength);
    result[newLength] = '\0';
    return result;
}

void inplace_trim(char *s)
{
    char const *firstWord, *trailingSpace;
    size_t newLength;

    get_trim_bounds(s, &firstWord, &trailingSpace);
    newLength = trailingSpace - firstWord;

    memmove(s, firstWord, newLength);
    s[newLength] = '\0';
}
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#include<stdio.h>
#include<ctype.h>

main()
{
    char sent[10]={' ',' ',' ','s','t','a','r','s',' ',' '};
    int i,j=0;
    char rec[10];

    for(i=0;i<=10;i++)
    {
        if(!isspace(sent[i]))
        {

            rec[j]=sent[i];
            j++;
        }
    }

printf("\n%s\n",rec);

}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't this trim all spaces? I think the OP wants just leading/trailing spaces to be trimmed. –  ysap Mar 27 '13 at 16:49
    
This invokes UB with isspace(sent[10]). –  chux Nov 7 at 4:52

This is the shortest possible implementation I can think of:

static const char *WhiteSpace=" \n\r\t";
char* trim(char *t)
{
    char *e=t+(t!=NULL?strlen(t):0);               // *e initially points to end of string
    if (t==NULL) return;
    do --e; while (strchr(WhiteSpace, *e) && e>=t);  // Find last char that is not \r\n\t
    *(++e)=0;                                      // Null-terminate
    e=t+strspn (t,WhiteSpace);                           // Find first char that is not \t
    return e>t?memmove(t,e,strlen(e)+1):t;                  // memmove string contents and terminator
}
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void ltrim(char str[PATH_MAX])
{
        int i = 0, j = 0;
        char buf[PATH_MAX];
        strcpy(buf, str);
        for(;str[i] == ' ';i++);

        for(;str[i] != '\0';i++,j++)
                buf[j] = str[i];
        buf[j] = '\0';
        strcpy(str, buf);
}
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Here is what I disclosed regarding the question in Linux kernel code:

/**
 * skip_spaces - Removes leading whitespace from @s.
 * @s: The string to be stripped.
 *
 * Returns a pointer to the first non-whitespace character in @s.
 */
char *skip_spaces(const char *str)
{
    while (isspace(*str))
            ++str;
    return (char *)str;
}

/**
 * strim - Removes leading and trailing whitespace from @s.
 * @s: The string to be stripped.
 *
 * Note that the first trailing whitespace is replaced with a %NUL-terminator
 * in the given string @s. Returns a pointer to the first non-whitespace
 * character in @s.
 */
char *strim(char *s)
{
    size_t size;
    char *end;

    size = strlen(s);

    if (!size)
            return s;

    end = s + size - 1;
    while (end >= s && isspace(*end))
            end--;
    *(end + 1) = '\0';

    return skip_spaces(s);
}

It is supposed to be bug free due to the origin ;-)

Mine one piece is closer to KISS principle I guess:

/**
 * trim spaces
 **/
char * trim_inplace(char * s, int len)
{
    // trim leading
    while (len && isspace(s[0]))
    {
        s++; len--;
    }

    // trim trailing
    while (len && isspace(s[len - 1]))
    {
        s[len - 1] = 0; len--;
    }

    return s;
}
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Late to the trim party

Features:
1. Trim the beginning quickly, as in a number of other answers.
2. After going to the end, trimming the right with only 1 test per loop. Like @jfm3, but works for an all white-space string)
3. To avoid undefined behavior when char is a signed char, cast *s to unsigned char.

Character handling "In all cases the argument is an int, the value of which shall be representable as an unsigned char or shall equal the value of the macro EOF. If the argument has any other value, the behavior is undefined." C11 §7.4 1

#include <ctype.h>

// Return a pointer to the trimmed string
char *string_trim_inplace(char *s) {
  while (isspace((unsigned char) *s)) s++;
  if (*s) {
    char *p = s;
    while (*p) p++;
    while (isspace((unsigned char) *(--p)));
    p[1] = '\0';
  }
  return s;
}
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What do you think about using StrTrim function defined in header Shlwapi.h.? It is straight forward rather defining on your own.
Details can be found on:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb773454(v=vs.85).aspx

If you have
char ausCaptain[]="GeorgeBailey ";
StrTrim(ausCaptain," ");
This will give ausCaptain as "GeorgeBailey" not "GeorgeBailey ".

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