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I have a fairly simple application (like CRM) which has a lot of contacts and associated tags.

A user can search giving lot of criteria (search-items) such as

  • updated_time in last 10 days
  • tags in xxx
  • tags not in xxx
  • first_name starts with xxx
  • first_name not in 'Smith'

I understand indexing and how filters (not in) cannot work on more than one property.

For me, since most of the times, reporting is done in a cron - I can iterate through all records and process them. However, I would like to know the best optimized route of doing it.

I am hoping that instead of querying 'ALL', I can get close to a query which can run with the appengine design limits and then manually match rest of the items in the query.

One way of doing it is to start with the first search-item and then get count, add another the next search-item, get count. The point it bails out, I then process those records with rest of the search-items manually.

The question is

  • Is there a way before hand to know if a query is valid programatically w/o doing a count
  • How do you determine the best of search-items in a set which do not collide (like not-in does not work on many filters) etc.

The only way I see it is to get all equal filters as one query, take the first in-equality filter or in, execute it and just iterate over the search entities.

Is there a library which can help me ;)

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1 Answer 1

I understand indexing and how filters (not in) cannot work on more than one property.

This is not strictly true. You may create a "composite index" which allows you to perform filters on multiple fields. These consume additional data.

You may also generate your own equivalent of composite index by generating your own "composite field" that you can use to query against.

Is there a way before hand to know if a query is valid programatically w/o doing a count

I'm not sure I understand what kind of validity you're referring to.

How do you determine the best of search-items in a set which do not collide (like not-in does not work on many filters) etc.

A "not in" filter is not trivial. One way is to create two arrays (repeated fields). One with all the tagged entries and one with not all the tags. This would allow you to easily find all the entities with and without the tag. The only issue is that once you create a new tag, you have to sweep across the entities adding a "not in" entry for all the entities.

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I cannot use composite index as I have many search criterias - about 20 of them. In and not in. Lets say I have multiple equality and inequality criteria given out by the user, currently I am applying all equality filters first, getting results and then filtering the results based on the rest of the filters in the initial query set. The initial question was to see if we can somehow add as many queries as possible. Also about the tags arrays, I cannot use arrays for that as the tags are dynamically added by the user quite often. –  cloudpre Sep 11 '12 at 11:39

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