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I'm writing RIA system (chrome-only) for our company. Number of different controls is growing up and I've decided to simplify code using Shadow DOM. It's great, but sometimes it needs external re-styling. And that's the problem, an ex.:

The taskbar:

<taskbar side="right">
  <menubtn />
  <applist scrollable>
    <btn app="SpoPlanMon" />
  </applist>
  <tray />
</taskbar>

With Shadow DOM, applist transforms to:

<applist>
  <scroll-wrap>
    <scroll-bar>
      <scroll-slider />
    </scroll-bar>
    <scroll-cont>
      <btn app="SpoPlanMon" />
    </scroll-cont>
  </scroll>
</applist>

In this case I need to style <scroll-slider /> depending on <taskbar /> side (specified in so-called attribute, may be changed dynamically). Unfortunately, I can't just write taskbar[side="top"] scroll-slider {...}, because only lower-boundary incapsulation is allowed.

Is there any way to css-select elements from the "other side"? Or maybe something like video::-webkit-media-controls-panel?

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2 Answers 2

If you're using full-blown Web Components instead of just Shadow DOM, you should be able to get at the parent taskbar element from the Javascript. Something like this:

<element>
    <template>
        ...
    </template>
    <script>
        if (this !== window) {
            this.lifecycle({
                created: function() {
                    this.parentElement.attributes['side'].nodeValue; // "right"
                }
            });
        }
    </script>
</element>

This, however, makes it so that you can no longer use the applist component outside of a taskbar, which generally is a bad thing. We should try and make components as modular, independent, and reusable as possible. Ask yourself, "What exactly do I need to know about the parent element?" Could you instead write the applist as

<applist scrollable="right">...

The duplication is a small price to pay for the ability to use this component anywhere you want. Who knows? In the future you may decide to use taskbar and applist in such a way that side="right" but scrollable="bottom"!

Update

If you want to allow the styling of the Shadow DOM elements to change dynamically with changes to the host element, you will soon be able to use the @host @-rule. The spec isn't clear here at all, but I think it will be used like this (taken from a comment on a bug for the W3 spec for Web Components):

@host {
    div { background-color: white; }
    .warning { background-color: yellow; }
    .important .warning { background-color: orange; }
}

This would (I think) give the host a default background color of white, which would be overriden to yellow if the host has the class warning. It would also style a warning element inside the host with a background color of orange if the host has the class important.

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Ok, I can dublicate, but it doesn't affect anyway. The point is to have dynamic changes on shaded tree according to external changes, such as provided by CSS. The only way I see for now to change the style of shadow is to put some classes/id/inline-styles right in the shadow. And it's sad... –  Buncha Sep 5 '12 at 17:55
    
Another example is that you have super-dooper-button, made with one tag and Shadow DOM. And you have to put many of that buttons in the some panel, but there they must look little different (color, for ex.) –  Buncha Sep 5 '12 at 18:02
    
Does my update answer your problem? –  CletusW Sep 7 '12 at 22:59

You can use CSS Variables to communicate the left/right context in to the slider. See this jsfiddle for a working example. (You have to have the Enable experimental WebKit features flag on in Chrome.)

Here is how it works: The outer component sets a variable for every property that depends on the context (in this case, being on the left or the right). In this example I’m just setting up one variable, a color:

<style>
*[side="right"] {
  -webkit-var-slider-color: red;
}

*[side="left"] {
  -webkit-var-slider-color: green;
}
</style>
<taskbar side="right">
  <menubtn />
  <applist scrollable>
    <btn app="SpoPlanMon" />
  </applist>
</taskbar>​

The component simply uses the variable:

<applist>
  <style>
  scroll-slider {
    background: grey; /* default */
    background: -webkit-var(slider-color);
  }
  </style>
  <scroll-wrap>
    <scroll-bar>
      <scroll-slider />
    </scroll-bar>
    <scroll-cont>
      <btn app="SpoPlanMon" />
    </scroll-cont>
  </scroll>
</applist>

In this example, the <taskbar side="right"> element sets the slider-color variable to red. CSS Variables automatically flow into Shadow DOM, so inside the applist, the scroll-slider’s background is set to red. If you change the taskbar to be side="left" the styles are recomputed and the scroll-slider’s background automatically flips to green.

If you want to configure more properties, just use more variables.

The purpose of defining the property twice where it is used

background: grey; /* default */
background: -webkit-var(slider-color);

is to handle the case when the variable is not set. In that case, the second property definition will be invalid which causes it to be dropped, so the first property definition applies. When the variable is set correctly, the second definition is valid and overrides the first definition.

The neat part about CSS Variables is that they nest along with elements defining the variables. So if you have a <taskbar side="left"> inside of the SpoPlanMon Shadow DOM, it will reset the slider-color variable to green and any slider nested inside of it will be green.

There is a design proposal to let web components expose parts inside shadow DOM to styling “from the outside” using author-defined pseudo IDs. (W3 Bug 15196 is not terribly descriptive, but it is the spec bug for this.)

To use a pseudo ID to tackle this problem, AppList exposes its scroll slider with a pseudo ID:

<applist>
  <scroll-wrap>
    <scroll-bar>
      <scroll-slider pseudo="slider" />
    </scroll-bar>
    <scroll-cont>
      <btn app="SpoPlanMon" />
    </scroll-cont>
  </scroll>
</applist>

Then the taskbar can style it:

<taskbar side="right">
  <style scoped>
    taskbar[side="right"] applist:pseudo(slider) {
      /* styles apply to the <scroll-slider> */
    }
  </style>
  <menubtn />
  <applist scrollable>
    <btn app="SpoPlanMon" />
  </applist>
  <tray />
</taskbar>

This is good because it keeps the styles specific to the taskbar context together with the taskbar. The applist needs to put a pseudo on its slider, so you can get into trouble if you’re reusing a component which didn’t give psuedos to everything you needed to style (CSS is powerful, so it brings great power to mess things up, so I don’t think components will typically expose a lot of pseudo IDs.)

This is not implemented, or even in specs! In fact the exact syntax will probably change. So for now you can not rely on the pseudo ID solution. CSS Variables are probably the way to go.

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