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Question 1

how to make an iterable object like this:

0 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 ....

Question 2

if use list(obj) on the object above would this eat up machine's memory? how to prevent it?

Please don't use python2

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thank you ill make two questions –  Max Sep 4 '12 at 11:07
2  
Also, if this is homework, we appreciate it if you use the homework tag so we can help you learn instead of just handing over the answers. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 4 '12 at 11:08
    
no,not a homework –  Max Sep 4 '12 at 11:13
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can make an infinite generator that counts up and down:

def updown(n):
    while True:
        for i in range(n):
            yield i
        for i in range(n - 2, 0, -1):
            yield i

uptofive = updown(6)
for i in range(20):
    print uptofive.next(),

would output:

0 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1

You cannot prevent list(updown(6)) from trying to consume all memory, no. As the doctor would say: "Then don't do that!".

Use .next() calls instead, or use your generator with another statement that limits the number of times you iterate over the generator. The itertools.islice() function would do just that:

import itertools
list(itertools.islice(updown(6), 20))
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You have a duplicate "5" in there. –  mhawke Sep 4 '12 at 11:15
    
In Python 2, xrange might be a bit better in this context. –  cdarke Sep 4 '12 at 11:15
    
@cdarke: for small ranges, don't bother, and it'll keep it portable with minimum fuss. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 4 '12 at 11:16
1  
@mhawke: What dupe 5? innocent whistle –  Martijn Pieters Sep 4 '12 at 11:18
1  
@MartijnPieters doesn't work in python3 –  Max Sep 5 '12 at 4:19
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An alternative is to use itertools.cycle():

from itertools import cycle

def oscillator(start, stop):
    # assumes stop >= start
    return cycle(range(start, stop+1) + range(stop-1, start, -1))

o = oscillator(0, 5)
for i in range(30):
    print o.next(),
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1  
doesn't work in python3 –  Max Sep 5 '12 at 4:20
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