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This is an interview Question.

A binary search tree is given and the values of two nodes have been swapped. The question is how to find both the nodes and the swapped values in a single traversal of the tree?

i have tried to solve this using below code but i am not able to stop the recursion so i am getting segmentation fault. help me how to stop recursion.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

 /* A binary tree node has data, pointer to left child
 and a pointer to right child */
 struct node
{
 int data;
 struct node* left;
 struct node* right;
};
/* Helper function that allocates a new node with the
 given data and NULL left and right pointers. */
 struct node* newNode(int data)
 {
  struct node* node = (struct node*)
                    malloc(sizeof(struct node));
 node->data = data;
 node->left = NULL;
 node->right = NULL;
 return(node);
 }
void modifiedInorder(struct node *root, struct node **nextNode)
 {
    static int nextdata=INT_MAX;
    if(root)
    {       
        modifiedInorder(root->right, nextNode);
        if(root->data > nextdata)
        return;
        *nextNode = root;
        nextdata = root->data;

        modifiedInorder(root->left, nextNode);          
    }
}

void inorder(struct node *root, struct node *copyroot, struct node **prevNode)
{
    static int prevdata = INT_MIN; 
    if(root)
    {
        inorder(root->left, copyroot, prevNode);
        if(root->data < prevdata)
        {
            struct node *nextNode = NULL;
            modifiedInorder(copyroot, &nextNode);

            int data = nextNode->data;
            nextNode->data = (*prevNode)->data;
            (*prevNode)->data = data;
            return;
        }
        *prevNode = root;
        prevdata = root->data;
        inorder(root->right, copyroot, prevNode);           
    }
}

/* Given a binary tree, print its nodes in inorder*/
void printInorder(struct node* node)
{
    if (node == NULL)
        return;

    /* first recur on left child */
    printInorder(node->left);

    /* then print the data of node */
    printf("%d ", node->data);

    /* now recur on right child */
    printInorder(node->right);
}


int main()
{
    /*   4
        /  \
       2    3
      / \
     1   5
    */

    struct node *root = newNode(1);  // newNode will return a node.
    root->left        = newNode(2);
    root->right       = newNode(3);
    root->left->left  = newNode(4);
    root->left->right = newNode(5);
    printf("Inorder Traversal of the original tree\n ");
    printInorder(root);

    struct node *prevNode=NULL;
    inorder(root, root, &prevNode);

    printf("\nInorder Traversal of the fixed tree \n");
    printInorder(root);

    return 0;

}
share|improve this question
2  
WhatHaveYouTried ? – Minion91 Sep 4 '12 at 11:06
    
I have tried using inorder traverse and modified inorder traverse. modified inorder traverse -right child then root and then left child – Aalok Sep 4 '12 at 11:08
1  
Some code would be nice, because inorder traverse seems the correct approach. – Minion91 Sep 4 '12 at 11:16
    
I am not able to paste my code please Help.. – Aalok Sep 4 '12 at 11:32
    
I am unable to help you any further with the information provided as the answer that has been submitted is the correct approach. – Minion91 Sep 4 '12 at 11:39

Walk to the tree using inorder traversal. By using that you will get all the elements sorted and the one element that will be greater than the surrounding elements is swapped.

For example consider this below binary tree

          _  20  _
         /         \
      15             30
     /   \         /   \ 
   10    17      25     33
  / |   /  \    /  \    |  \
9  16  12  18  22  26  31  34

First, we linearize this into an array and we get

9 10 16 15 12 17 18 20 22 25 26 30 31 33 34

Now you can notice that 16 is greater than its surrounding elements and that 12 is less than them. This immediately tells us that 12 and 16 were swapped.

share|improve this answer
    
I am looking for other than this solution. – Aalok Sep 4 '12 at 11:33
    
Follow the same BST which i mentioned top in that first traverse all the left elements must be less than root and all the right elements must be greater than root element. In second traverse go to left sub tree in that all the left sub tree elements must be less than 15 but 16 is there in the left tree so it's violation. Same like that in right sub tree all the elements must be greater than 15 but 12 s there which is smaller than 15. So you can use getMAX and getMIN methods and traversing each element with comparisons algorithm as a another solution. – user1206604 Sep 4 '12 at 11:48
1  
Well, that's obviously wrong. Suppose I have a tree which linearize to {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}. Now I swap 2 and 5: {1, 5, 3, 4, 2, 6}. Now I have two elements greater than their surroundings (5 and 4) and two elements less than surroundings (3 and 2) – Sergey Weiss Sep 4 '12 at 12:09
    
Instead of comparing surroundings, the principle is that if a tree is bst and is traversed inorder, then the result would be a sorted array. In the example above, 5 is the first element out of place being greater than 3. 2 is the second element out of place being less than 4. – fayyazkl Sep 4 '12 at 12:12
    
@Venkat didn't mention that. He just said we'll get ONE element greater than surroundings – Sergey Weiss Sep 4 '12 at 12:14

The following function validates if a tree is BST or not by recursively iterating both left and right subtrees while tightening the bounds.

I believe it can be modified to achieve the above task by

  1. Instead of returning false, return temp i.e. pointer to node which fails the tree from being BST.
  2. There would be two such instances which gives both the swapped values.

EDIT: We would need to distinguish between recursive function returning true vs pointer to node which is swapped

This assumes that there are only two such values as mentioned in the problem definition

bool validate_bst(tnode *temp, int min, int max)
{
        if(temp == NULL)
                return true;

        if(temp->data > min && temp->data < max)
        {
                if( validate_bst(temp->left, min, temp->data) && 
                    validate_bst(temp->right, temp->data, max) )
                        return true;
        }

        return false;
}

The main would call above api like this

   validate_bst(root, -1, 100); // Basically we pass -1 as min and 100 as max in
                                     // this instance
share|improve this answer

I found another solution to this questions on Geeksforgeeks.com ..............guys u can look into this thread for more explanation of below code http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/archives/23616

// Two nodes in the BST's swapped, correct the BST.
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/* A binary tree node has data, pointer to left child
and a pointer to right child */
struct node
{
int data;
struct node *left, *right;
};

// A utility function to swap two integers
void swap( int* a, int* b )
{
int t = *a;
*a = *b;
*b = t;
}

/* Helper function that allocates a new node with the
given data and NULL left and right pointers. */
struct node* newNode(int data)
{
struct node* node = (struct node *)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
node->data = data;
node->left = NULL;
node->right = NULL;
return(node);
}

// This function does inorder traversal to find out the two swapped nodes.
// It sets three pointers, first, middle and last.  If the swapped nodes are
// adjacent to each other, then first and middle contain the resultant nodes
// Else, first and last contain the resultant nodes
void correctBSTUtil( struct node* root, struct node** first,
                 struct node** middle, struct node** last,
                 struct node** prev )
{
if( root )
{
    // Recur for the left subtree
    correctBSTUtil( root->left, first, middle, last, prev );

    // If this node is smaller than the previous node, it's violating
    // the BST rule.
    if (*prev && root->data < (*prev)->data)
    {
        // If this is first violation, mark these two nodes as
        // 'first' and 'middle'
        if ( !*first )
        {
            *first = *prev;
            *middle = root;
        }

        // If this is second violation, mark this node as last
        else
            *last = root;
    }

    // Mark this node as previous
    *prev = root;

    // Recur for the right subtree
    correctBSTUtil( root->right, first, middle, last, prev );
}
}

// A function to fix a given BST where two nodes are swapped.  This
// function uses correctBSTUtil() to find out two nodes and swaps the
// nodes to fix the BST
void correctBST( struct node* root )
{
// Initialize pointers needed for correctBSTUtil()
struct node *first, *middle, *last, *prev;
first = middle = last = prev = NULL;

// Set the poiters to find out two nodes
correctBSTUtil( root, &first, &middle, &last, &prev );

// Fix (or correct) the tree
if( first && last )
    swap( &(first->data), &(last->data) );
else if( first && middle ) // Adjacent nodes swapped
    swap( &(first->data), &(middle->data) );

// else nodes have not been swapped, passed tree is really BST.
}

/* A utility function to print Inoder traversal */
void printInorder(struct node* node)
{
if (node == NULL)
    return;
printInorder(node->left);
printf("%d ", node->data);
printInorder(node->right);
}

/* Driver program to test above functions*/
int main()
{
/*   6
    /  \
   10    2
  / \   / \
 1   3 7  12
 10 and 2 are swapped
*/

struct node *root = newNode(6);
root->left        = newNode(10);
root->right       = newNode(2);
root->left->left  = newNode(1);
root->left->right = newNode(3);
root->right->right = newNode(12);
root->right->left = newNode(7);

printf("Inorder Traversal of the original tree \n");
printInorder(root);

correctBST(root);

printf("\nInorder Traversal of the fixed tree \n");
printInorder(root);

return 0;
}
Output:

 Inorder Traversal of the original tree
 1 10 3 6 7 2 12
 Inorder Traversal of the fixed tree
 1 2 3 6 7 10 12
 Time Complexity: O(n)

For more test cases please refer to this link http://ideone.com/uNlPx

share|improve this answer
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – hims056 Sep 14 '12 at 5:19

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