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I have some code of my application that makes usage of boost inteprocess scoped lock with timers. When a mutex is acquired in one thread, a second thread tyring to acquire it for few milliseconds will fail and will log something to screeen.

I don't know why but with the version of boost 1.50 this doens't work anymore. The code below I can see that the thread #2 doesn't print "ERROR" but is completely stuck.

Am I missing something here?

I am using LINUX kernel 2.6.32 with g++.

COuld it be something to deal with UTC? I read o boost that the time used by such lock is UTC and in date time I am reading right now about local_adjustor and conversion from local to utc and vice-versa.

AFG

   #include <iostream>
   #include <boost/interprocess/sync/scoped_lock.hpp>
   #include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>
   #include <boost/interprocess/sync/named_mutex.hpp>
   #include <boost/thread.hpp>
   #include <boost/bind.hpp>

   namespace bi = boost::interprocess;


   void  lock_test( bi::named_mutex& mt, bool long_sleep ) { 

           boost::posix_time::ptime pt = 
             boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::local_time()
             +  boost::posix_time::milliseconds(100);

            bi::scoped_lock<bi::named_mutex> l( mt, pt );
            if( l.owns() ){
            std::cout << "Locked"<<std::endl;
            }
            else{
            std::cout << "ERROR" << std::endl;
            std::cout.flush();
            return ;
            }

            if(long_sleep){
                while(true) {sleep(1);std::cout<<"[]";std::cout.flush();}
            }
        }

        int main(){

               bi::named_mutex  m_mutex( bi::open_or_create, "ciao"
               , bi::permissions( 0666  ));
               boost::thread t1 = boost::thread( &lock_test
               , boost::ref( m_mutex), true );
               sleep(4);
               boost::thread t2 = boost::thread(  &lock_test
               , boost::ref(m_mutex), false );
               while(true){sleep(1);}
        }
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You have't said what platform you're using, but on *NIX you can use strace, dtrace, truss or similar to find out what arguments are being passed to the system synchronization primitives, and where your threads are blocked –  Useless Sep 4 '12 at 11:39
    
I updated my post. I am using LINUX. With strace I can see that a nanosleep continuosly called. –  Abruzzo Forte e Gentile Sep 4 '12 at 11:54
1  
Looks like the scoped_lock should either use sem_timedwait, or sem_trywait with a yield loop if the BOOST_INTERPROCESS_POSIX_TIMEOUTS macro is not defined. Can you tell which is used, and whether that macro is defined? –  Useless Sep 4 '12 at 12:24
    
HI. I ddebugged and the code is using sem_timedwait with BOOST_INTERPROCESS_POSIX_TIMEOUTS defined. –  Abruzzo Forte e Gentile Sep 4 '12 at 13:15
    
It looks that if I switch from boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::local_time() to boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::universal_time() everything works fine. –  Abruzzo Forte e Gentile Sep 4 '12 at 13:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It looks that if I switch from boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::local_time() to

 boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::universal_time() 

everything works fine.

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which OS are you using? –  Oliver Stutz Sep 5 '12 at 11:05
    
I am using Linux 2.6.32 –  Abruzzo Forte e Gentile Sep 5 '12 at 13:11

You should use boost::get_system_time(), there are quite a few examples with it. Though I can't find the authoritative source, I use microsec_clock exactly as you do and get similar problems. Just discovered the bug though, will update when I'll test the fix.

Usage of boost::unique_lock::timed_lock

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