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I have three column value in excel sheet

  A: # of unsuccessful transfers to CCR  (CTI) =11986
  B: # of calls NOT wrapped =8585
  C: # of wrapped calls= 15283

and total of the three column is # of incoming calls(CTI)= 37017( this is sum of # of wrapped calls + # of unsuccessful transfers to CCR (CTI) + # of calls NOT wrapped)

I also calculate # of unaccounted calls(This is substracion of # of wrapped calls - # of unsuccessful transfers to CCR (CTI) - # of calls NOT wrapped)

So my # of unaccounted calls = 1163

Now i have to find out percentage of uncounted calls so i divide 37017/1163

So my percentatge is 3%, ideally it should be 0%, how do i find out in oracle that out of 3% what percent falls in A, B or C.

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2  
What are A, B and C??? –  Vincent Malgrat Sep 4 '12 at 13:11
    
# of unsuccessful transfers to CCR (CTI) =11986 # of calls NOT wrapped =8585 # of wrapped calls= 15283 –  user803860 Sep 4 '12 at 13:33
    
A+B+C=35854. You seem to be saying that A+B+C should be 37017, but you haven't said why, or where that larger number comes from. You then find the difference between that apparently arbitrary number and the actual one is 1163, but I can only assume you must have known that to get 37017 in the first place. Why would any part of that 'fall in' A, B or C at all, and how can anyone know how it would split between them? And what has any of this got to do with Oracle or PL/SQL? –  Alex Poole Sep 4 '12 at 13:59
    
Sorry for teh confusion 37017 is coming from database select qry select count(distinct switch_id) from xx_new.xx_cti_call_details@appsread.prd.com where dealer_name = 'XYG' and TRUNC(CREATION_DATE) BETWEEN '01-JUL-2012' AND '31-JUL-2012' –  user803860 Sep 4 '12 at 14:06
    
So where do A, B and C come from before they appear in Excel - also from a query against the same data? If you so you'll need to show all the queries and data structures (in the question, not in comments, please). If there's no link between the data then it doesn't seem to be an answerable question. –  Alex Poole Sep 4 '12 at 14:10

1 Answer 1

A B C comes from database qry, and the source is same but bunch of different filters for each qry for A B and C

That might allow you spot a pattern in the rows that aren't picked up by any A, B or C, though you'd still need to work out which of the three queries you would have expected each row (or pattern of rows) to have been picked up by, and why they were missed.

Since the sum of the counts from the three queries with additional filters is lower than the count from the query without those filters, you seem to have a gap in the filters themselves. If I had to guess then the first place I'd look is for incorrect handling of null values, trying to equate them (since null is neither equal or not equal to anything, even itself). But that's clearly speculation, and without seeing the filters and knowing which columns can be null isn't very helpful.

You can maybe isolate the 1163 rows that aren't showing up by using minus to find the rows picked up by the 'total' query and not included by any of those producing A, B and C; something like:

select *
from xx_new.xx_cti_call_details@appsread.prd.com
where dealer_name = 'XYG'
and TRUNC(CREATION_DATE) BETWEEN '01-JUL-2012' AND '31-JUL-2012'
minus
select *
from xx_new.xx_cti_call_details@appsread.prd.com
where dealer_name = 'XYG'
and TRUNC(CREATION_DATE) BETWEEN '01-JUL-2012' AND '31-JUL-2012'
and <additional filters for A>
minus
select *
from xx_new.xx_cti_call_details@appsread.prd.com
where dealer_name = 'XYG'
and TRUNC(CREATION_DATE) BETWEEN '01-JUL-2012' AND '31-JUL-2012'
and <additional filters for B>
minus
select *
from xx_new.xx_cti_call_details@appsread.prd.com
where dealer_name = 'XYG'
and TRUNC(CREATION_DATE) BETWEEN '01-JUL-2012' AND '31-JUL-2012'
and <additional filters for C>

I'm curious about you having a distinct in your initial query though, since it suggests you're counting switches calls are made from rather than the calls themselves. It also might mean the counts should not add up - though in that case I'd perhaps expect A+B+C to be greater than the simple as there would be the potential for overlaps - and that select * might actually return more than 1163 rows; in which case you might only want to select the columns you think might be a problem.

Incidentally, if creation_date is indexed then you might get better performance with where creation_date >= date '2012-07-01' and creation_date < date '2012-08-01', as the trunk() function woudl prevent the index being used. Might not be an issue for you though.

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