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I am trying to extract content from a XHTML document-- in this document, within a div, there are a number of 'b' elements, each followed by a link.

For eg--

<div id="main">
    <b> Bold text 1</b>
    <a href="http://link.com/"> some link 1</a>
      <b> Bold text 2</b>
    <a href="http://link.com/"> some link 2</a>     
    <b> ABRACADABRA</b>
    <a href="http://link.com/"> abracadbralink</a>
</div>

Now, I want to extract the link 'abracadabralink'-- the problems are that, I dont know how many and elements are there before this specific link-- in different documents there are a different number of such elements- sometimes there are many links immediately after a single element-- all I do know is that the text for the element that occurs just before the link that I want, is always fixed.

So the only fixed information is that I want the link immediately after the element with known text-- how do I get this link using XQuery?

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2 Answers 2

If I get it right, you are interested in the value of the @href attribute? This can be done with standard XPath syntax:

doc('yourdoc.xml')//*[. = ' abracadbralink']/@href/string()

For more information on XPath, I’d advise you to check out some online tutorials, such as http://www.w3schools.com/xpath/default.asp

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I only know the text "abracadabra" that appears just before the link that i want-- again, the "abracadabralink"is only indicative-- eg the link can be <a href="xyz.com/">; xyzlink</a>-- only the text "abracadabra" that appears before the link, enclosed in a 'b' element, is known to me... –  Arvind Sep 4 '12 at 13:42

I guess the following should work for you:

$yournode/b[. = ' ABRACADABRA']/following-sibling::a/@href/string()
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