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I am reading the "Learn C the hard way" book and found a code snippet there that looks like this (the below is my code, but the structure of the program is the same):

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class Person {
private:
    string name;
    int age;
public:
Person(string name, int age) {;
        this->name = name;
        this->age = age;
    }


~Person() {
    }
};

// When whould I do like this?
class Person *Create_person(string name, int age) {
    class Person *person = new Person(name, age);
    return person;
};    

int main() {
    Person *person = Create_person("John", 30);
}

Look especially at

class Person *Create_person(string name, int age) {
        class Person *person = new Person(name, age);
        return person;
    };

What kind of function is that? Why would I call it like that and not just Person *person = new Person? Is it a short form for

class Person {
public:
   Person *Create_person(string name, int age){
        Person *person = new Person(name, age);
        return person;
   }
}

?

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9  
Wait, "Learn C the hard way" teaches C++ instead of C? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 4 '12 at 13:05
3  
@R.MartinhoFernandes - yes, that's what makes it hard. –  Pete Becker Sep 4 '12 at 13:06
7  
This seems like a bad book. Burn it! –  Luchian Grigore Sep 4 '12 at 13:06
1  
At the very best, it appears obsolete. –  marko Sep 4 '12 at 13:08
1  
It's a factory function. Not needed here, but sometimes a useful concept. –  Pete Becker Sep 4 '12 at 13:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is nothing special about that function. class Person and Person are exactly the same type.

class Person *Create_person(string name, int age) {
    class Person *person = new Person(name, age);
    return person;
};

and

Person *Create_person(string name, int age) {
    Person *person = new Person(name, age);
    return person;
};

mean the same thing. The function seems pointless anyway, you can just call new Person(name, age) directly, as you figured already.

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Create_person is a global function that creates a Person object on the free store and returns the address of that object. In that regard, it's exactly like new Person(whatever) and, in this context, entirely redundant. There are contexts where this kind of function is handy, so this could be a gentle introduction to factory functions.

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On the other hand, it could also be a Java hangover. –  Pete Becker Sep 4 '12 at 13:14

The idiom of using a CreatePerson function, rather than doing new directly, is called the factory method pattern. It's fairly rare to see it used for a class without virtual functions; it's usually used when the calling code only sees an abstract base class, and knows nothing of the actual type which may be newed.

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class Person *Create_person(string name, int age) {
        class Person *person = new Person(name, age);
        return person;
    };

is a function in the global namespace that returns a pointer to a Person object. The class keyword is not needed here and can be omitted. Actually, it should be ommited. The reason why it is there is probably because it's "C-style".

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