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If I have a multiline array and it contains for example the following integers with different numbers of integers per line:

1 1 1 2 1 1
2 1 4 1
2 1 1 3 1 6

How do I convert it to an array of counts in perl with zeros for keys with no counts? I can do it for the single array case using map, but I'm struggling with this multiline case/array of array case.

#For line 1, 1 => 5, 2 => 1
#For line 2, 1 => 2, 2 => 1, 4 => 1
#For line 3, 1 => 3, 2 => 1, 3 => 1, 6 => 1

So the result looks like this:

5 1 0 0 0 0
2 1 0 1 0 0
3 1 1 0 0 1

Thanks!

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3  
As much as I like solving problems, on stackoverflow, it is frowned upon to ask others to write your code for you. Instead, you show your code, and ask for help identifying your problem. So, what have you tried? –  TLP Sep 4 '12 at 13:11
    
My question was phrased in this manner because I have previously been told to include an example of what I mean and I also find people want questions which are succinct. I will endeavour to show code in the future for debugging in the future. I would also like to say that I am learning at the moment and examples really help me understand syntax better - i find coding is completely different to learning a foreign language and much more difficult. I am very grateful that there is such a helpful community for whatever help members may provide. –  user1637359 Sep 4 '12 at 14:08
    
Providing an SSCCE is always a good idea. As you say, examples really help. –  TLP Sep 4 '12 at 14:33
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This seems to do what is required. It does the obvious thing of building an array of hashes of counts, then finds the maximum value amongst the keys of the hashes for building a display

use strict;
use warnings;

use feature 'say';

my @data;

while (<DATA>) {
  next unless /\S/;
  my %counts;
  $counts{$_}++ for split;
  push @data, \%counts;
}

my $max = 0;
for (map keys %$_, @data) {
  $max = $_ unless $max >= $_;
}

for my $row (@data) {
  say join ' ', map $row->{$_} // 0, 1 .. $max;
}

__DATA__

1 1 1 2 1 1
2 1 4 1
2 1 1 3 1 6

output

5 1 0 0 0 0
2 1 0 1 0 0
3 1 1 0 0 1
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To accommodate for negative matrix values, avoid hard coding $max to 0, and use $max //= $_;. –  TLP Sep 4 '12 at 15:43
    
More than that needs to be done to allow for negative values, and there is no evidence that it is necessary –  Borodin Sep 4 '12 at 18:25
    
Yes, you also need to find $min. It may not be necessary for this particular OP, but someone else might refer to this answer in the future. –  TLP Sep 4 '12 at 18:30
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ETA: Fixed support for negative matrix values. Assuming no float numbers can occur, since zero values are required.

The trick to using multidimensional arrays is to remember that an array can only contain scalar values. In this case, each scalar value is a reference to an array.

If your matrix can contain other values than positive integers, you must use a hash as data storage.

In the print below, I am using the defined-or operator to distinguish between uninitialized (zero) counts.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
use List::Util qw(max min);

my @a = (
    [qw(1 1 1 2 1 1)],
    [qw(2 1 4 1)],
    [qw(2 1 1 3 1 6)],
);

my @res;
my ($max, $min);

for my $aref (@a) {      # each array element is an array ref
    my %count;
    for (@$aref) {       # the array elements of each ref
        $count{$_}++;    # count the numbers
    }
    $max = max(@$aref, $max // ());
    $min = min(@$aref, $min // ());
    push @res, \%count;
}
for my $href (@res) {
    print join " ", map $href->{$_} // 0, $min .. $max;
    print "\n";
}
print Dumper \@res;

Output:

5 1 0 0 0 0
2 1 0 1 0 0
3 1 1 0 0 1
$VAR1 = [
          {
            '1' => 5,
            '2' => 1
          },
          {
            '4' => 1,
            '1' => 2,
            '2' => 1
          },
          {
            '6' => 1,
            '1' => 3,
            '3' => 1,
            '2' => 1
          }
        ];

Note the missing zero values. These can be added with a map statement similar to the one in the print statement.

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How about:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dump qw(dump);

while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    my @count = (0) x 7;
    $count[$_]++ for split;
    shift @count;
    dump @count;
}
__DATA__
1 1 1 2 1 1
2 1 4 1
2 1 1 3 1 6

output:

(5, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0)
(2, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0)
(3, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1)
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No need for chomp if you are using the default split on whitespace –  Borodin Sep 4 '12 at 13:38
    
I think the problem related to use of multidimensional arrays, not the counting itself. –  TLP Sep 4 '12 at 13:53
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use warnings;
use strict;
use Data::Dumper;
my @a = ([1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1], [2, 1, 4, 1], [2, 1, 1, 3, 1, 6]);
my @output = map { 
  my @in = (0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0);
  $in[$_-1]++ for @$_;
  \@in;
} @a;
print Dumper(\@output), "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Using map like this (the second instance) is ugly. Should be written $in[$_-1]++ for @$_. Also there are too many $_ around, and writing [ @in ] is copying the array to an anonymous array and throwing away the original: much better to just use \@in –  Borodin Sep 4 '12 at 13:28
    
@Borodin, thanks for the pointers –  perreal Sep 4 '12 at 13:36
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