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Given the following tables:

tableA:        | tableB:
               |
col1  col2     | col3  col4
-----------    | ----------
1     4        | 1     x
2     5        | 2     x
3     6        | 1     z
               | 2     z
               | 3     z

I want to write a stored procedure in DB2 which is added in tableB some rows, by modifying values of col3 with their mappings from tableA (1-4, 2-5, 3-6), so these rows added:

By looking rows where col4 = x, these rows have to be added in tableB:

               | 4     A1 -> (only 1 changed to its mapping value 4)
               | 2     A1

               | 1     B1   
               | 5     B1 -> (only 2 changed to its mapping value 5)

               | 4     C1 -> (1 changed to its mapping value 4)
               | 5     C1 -> (and 2 changed to its mapping value 5)

and by looking rows where col4 = z, these rows have to be added in tableB:

               | 4     A2 -> (only 1 changed to its mapping value 4)
               | 2     A2
               | 3     A2

               | 1     B2 
               | 5     B2 -> (only 2 changed to its mapping value 5)
               | 3     B2

               | 1     C2 
               | 2     C2
               | 6     C2 -> (only 3 changed to its mapping value 6)

               | 4     D2 -> (1 changed to its mapping value 4)
               | 5     D2 -> (and 2 changed to its mapping value 5)
               | 3     D2

               | 4     E2 -> (1 changed to its mapping value 4)
               | 2     E2
               | 6     E2 -> (and 3 changed to its mapping value 6)

               | 1     F2 
               | 5     F2 -> (2 changed to its mapping value 5)
               | 6     F2 -> (and 3 changed to its mapping value 6)

               | 4     G2 -> (1 changed to its mapping value 4)
               | 5     G2 -> (and 2 changed to its mapping value 5)
               | 6     G2 -> (and 3 changed to its mapping value 6)

Note here that in my example I have:

  • a 2 to 1 mapping (represented by 2 rows: [1,x] and [2,x]) so 3 more rows added in tableB for it.
  • and a 3 to 1 mapping (represented by 3 rows: [1,z], [2,z] and [3,z]) so 7 more rows added in tableB for it.

If I had a 4 to 1 mapping (represented by 4 rows) in tableB, 15 more rows had to be added.
If I had a 5 to 1 mapping (represented by 5 rows) in tableB, 31 more rows had to be added and so on...

(don't confuse these mappings with those of tableA. are different)

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The process you're describing is still a little hard to understand. Can you show what you want the actual output to look like? Especially since you say 'add column' but it sounds like you want to add rows... –  Clockwork-Muse Sep 4 '12 at 16:30
    
Yes it was my mistake... I mean rows. So only tableB is changing by adding to it the appropriate rows (27 more rows that I described in my example - [4,A1], [2,A1], [1,B1], ... , [5,G2], [6,G2]). –  George Pap Sep 5 '12 at 8:59
    
Okay, I think I get what you're going for - you're trying to generate every possible combination of the mapping. But you're making things confusing by using stuff like 'A1', 'B2', etc (because there's no way to generate that, unless there's a table you're not telling us about). I'm assuming that you're just using those to define 'groups', and that the values should actually be either their 'mapped' values, or whatever they were originally (if so, please change your 'result' data to match). I have to ask... why? –  Clockwork-Muse Sep 5 '12 at 15:39
    
Also, there's going to be a lot of identical rows (assuming I've understood what you're trying to accomplish), and you won't have any way to tell them apart... Please give us the exact output of the table you want, not the process explanation you have currently. You could do this with an SP, but not if you have potentially unlimited levels - you'd need something recursive, but because SQL works on sets, you wouldn't be able to get it to 'stop' at the 'first' row (ROW_NUMBER() doesn't seem to be allowed - and is worthless without ORDER BY anyways...). –  Clockwork-Muse Sep 5 '12 at 15:54
    
Actually in my schema there are more columns in these tables but only these I presented needed for this procedure... I have a way to keep col4 updated but ignore it for this moment. I just wanted you to know how the already existing information of tableB (by looking the 'groups' as you mentioned) used to produce the new rows. Yes its true,I need something recursive but I think there is a way to know where to stop by looking the number of occurrences of the values in col4. For example x exists 2 times so 2^2-1=3 rows will added,z exists 3 times so 2^3-1=7 rows will added, so its 2^k-1 new rows. –  George Pap Sep 5 '12 at 17:26

1 Answer 1

very hard for me to understand.

I think you would be best off by deleting each subset, then inserting the current mapping. (as opposed to trying to figure out the deltas)

this seems like a good reason to NOT denormalize like this.

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I have edited the question to make it clearly... thanks for your response –  George Pap Sep 4 '12 at 13:30

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