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How to use callbacks on jQuery each function?

I am trying something like:

$.each(images, function(key, value) { 
    new_images+= '<li><a href="'+value+'"><img src="'+value+'" alt="'+[key]+'" /></a></li>';
}, function (){
    $('#Gallery').remove();
    $('body').append('<ul class="gallery">'+new_images+'</ul>');
});
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1  
why callback? If you want to perform an action after an .each which is synchronous(!) you just write your code after the .each() –  devnull69 Sep 4 '12 at 13:22
1  
Why are you using two functions? The each function doesn't support that. Instead, include the 2nd function's statements within the first one. –  Cupidvogel Sep 4 '12 at 13:23
1  
.each only takes two values (a collection and a function), but you've passed it three (collection(?), function, function). What are you trying to do? –  Jim Sep 4 '12 at 13:23
    
@devnull69 the array is big (about 300 images) and so it can take a while... Is it good to use without callback? –  NoNameZ Sep 4 '12 at 13:25
    
@Jim just trying to get callback on it. –  NoNameZ Sep 4 '12 at 13:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

What's wrong with this code? You don't need a callback for $.each.

$.each(images, function(key, value) { 
    new_images+= '<li><a href="'+value+'"><img src="'+value+'" alt="'+[key]+'" /></a></li>';
});

$('#Gallery').remove();
$('body').append('<ul class="gallery">'+new_images+'</ul>');
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$.each(); is a synchronous function. That means you don't need a callback function inside because any code you write after $.each(); will run affter $.each(); ends.

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1  
the confusion arises because people (mis)use the term "callback" to refer to any time a function reference is passed, whether that function is subsequently called asynchronously, or not. –  Alnitak Sep 4 '12 at 13:33
    
@Alnitak I intuitively see a callback as some kind of trigger to execute code after a certain block/function/process/animation is finished. If this isn't correct or even just incomplete interpretation, could you refer me to some documentation that might help me grasp the concept better? The comment you made completely through me off, mainly because I'm still trying to learn all this "lingo" –  Fernando Silva Jul 25 '14 at 17:17
1  
@FernandoSilva well, see for example the MDN documentation for Array.prototype.map - developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… - They call the supplied function callback even though it isn't "something called after". –  Alnitak Jul 26 '14 at 10:44
    
@Alnitak so basically what you're saying is a callback is simply a reference to a function that will be executed within the function that passes that reference? Array.prototype.map cycles through an array and given certain conditions executes the passed callback function. So what we usually see in jQuery as a callback is simply a way to reference a function, that usually gets triggered after the success or complete is achieved, like with an animation and that's how people usually associate the callback term to an event type of thing? Is this correct? –  Fernando Silva Jul 26 '14 at 12:26
    
@Alnitak now you got me thinking. If I wanted to implement the callback behaviour, in php I would do something like function foo($callback){//do something; $callback();}, how could I achieve the same in javascript, would it be the same? function jsFoo(callback){//do something; callback();} ? –  Fernando Silva Jul 26 '14 at 12:31

Do you mean this?

$.each(images, function(key, value) { 
    new_images+= '<li><a href="'+value+'"><img src="'+value+'" alt="'+[key]+'" /></a></li>';
});
function myMethod(){
    $('#Gallery').remove();
    $('body').append('<ul class="gallery">'+new_images+'</ul>');
};
myMethod();
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Not sure about the callback you meant. I guess this is what you are looking for

$('#Gallery').remove();
var selectItems='<ul class="gallery">';
$.each(images, function(key, value) { 
    selectItems+= '<li><a href="'+value+'">
                              <img src="'+value+'" alt="'+[key]+'" /></a></li>';    
});   
selectItems+= '</ul>';
$('body').append(selectItems);
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I have now a solution for an .each-callback!

I had to do an ajax-request for each element in an array. So I made a div-container with all the div-elements for each element. Each time a load was made, the div-element changed to green and .slideUp, after .remove. And each time i asked if the div-container is empty. If yes, I know, all elements are fully loades (because removed).

Here a part of my code:

<script>
$(document).ready( function() {
    $.each(myChannels, function(index, value) {
        $("#tag_"+value).load('getxmls/ajaxrenewchannel/channel:'+value, function() {
            $("#tag_"+value).removeClass('alert-info').addClass('alert-success');
            $("#tag_"+value).slideUp('600', function () {
                $("#tag_"+value).remove();
                if( $('#loadcontainer').is(':empty') ) {
                    window.location = 'feeds/';
                }

                });

        });
    });
});
</script>

Hope this helps somebody out there...

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