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I'm new to C++ and am not sure what's wrong. This is a task I have been given in my programmging course at uni which is meant to take user input of a vector of grades and determine whether the grade is a passing one. When I compile I end up getting an error stating q1.cpp:30:21: error: could not convert ‘y’ from ‘int’ to ‘std::vector’ Not overly sure why. Sorry about the bad formatting.

I've added the code but not sure how to wrap it.

#include <vector>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int calcNumberOfPasses(vector<int> grades){
int x;
    for (int i=0; i<grades.size(); i++){
        cin >>grades[i];
    }
    cin >> x;
}



int main() {
    int y;
    vector<int> nGrade;
    nGrade.push_back(y);
    cout << "Enter how many grades you want to enter";
    for (int i=0; i<nGrade.size();i++){
        cin >> nGrade[i];
    }
    cin >> y;
    if (y>=50){
        cout << "this is a passing grade";
    }
    calcNumberOfPasses(y);
}
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calcNumberOfPasses(y); shouldn't you pass nGrade instead of y? –  BSen Sep 4 '12 at 13:29
    
"Sorry about the bad formatting." Don't apologize. Fix it. –  Pete Becker Sep 4 '12 at 13:30
3  
You are passing an int to a function that takes a vector<int>. What do you expect? –  Henrik Sep 4 '12 at 13:30
    
Let's think this through, starting with calcNumberOfPasses(). In your mind, what does the line cin >> x; do, and why does it do this at that particular point in the code? (My guess is that you don't know, but figuring it out will do much to straighten your logic out. This is why I ask the question.) –  thb Sep 4 '12 at 13:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The function calcNumberOfPasses is expecting a parameter of type vector<int>, you are passing it a parameter of type int. That much you can work out from the error message.

You are copying an undefined value into the vector on this line:

nGrade.push_back(y); // y hasn't been initialised yet, you probably want to remove this line.

Following that you are looping over the size of the grades vector, which hasn't been initialised yet.

Chances are, you want to do calcNumberOfPasses(nGrades);.

As an aside, you should use a reference to the vector, to avoid copying it.

In summary, I would through all of this code away and start again. No offence!

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Also worth mentioning is the fact that the calcNumberOfPasses should return int, but doesn't return anything (nor does it do any useful work at all). –  Grizzly Sep 4 '12 at 13:40

A vector is a collection -- a grouping of items of some base class. It's conceptually similar to an array. What you are doing is trying to repeatedly load a single variable and then pass that into a function that expects a vector.

Try breaking down the steps of the function you're writing. You are:

  1. Adding a single, uninitialized int to a vector.
  2. Trying to retrieve a number to control the number of grades you want to enter.
  3. Reading a single additional number into y.
  4. Passing that single number into a function that expects an array.

There are numerous things wrong with this function; I think you need to map out what data needs to go where.

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