Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For curiosity's sake...

In Ruby:

=>$ irb
1.8.7 :001 > puts x = 2
2
 => nil 
1.8.7 :002 > puts x += 2 while x < 40
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40

It's quite handy.

Is it possible to do that in Python in a single line and if yes how?

share|improve this question
2  
I don't know ruby, but I'd like to learn someday (so forgive my ignorance) -- How is this different than range(4,40,2)? Or an equivalent generator function? –  mgilson Sep 4 '12 at 13:41
    
the key here is that as others have answered, ruby allows to run a statement as an expression, so more stuff can be done in less space. I was wondering if it was possible to achieve a similar thing in python, just for the sake of curiosity. –  nemesisdesign Sep 4 '12 at 14:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The reason why you can not do exactly or very similarly the same in Python is because in Ruby, everything is expression.

Python distincts between statements and expressions and only expressions can be evaluated (therefore printed, I mean passed to print operator/function).

So such code cannot be done in Python in that form you showed us. Everything you can do is to find some "similar" way to write down statement above as a Python expression but it will definitely not be that "Rubyous".

IMHO, in Python, impossibility of such behaviour (as described in this use case), nicely follows "explicit is better than implicit" Zen of Python rule.

share|improve this answer
    
The first two pharagraphs of your answer explained it all. I'm not trying to find a "Rubyous" way to do something in Python, I just find comparing the two languages quite instructive. Is there a way to achieve the same loop in one line in python? I never use that kind of expressions in python, but as far as I know I can't do that in python, so I was wondering if it would be possible somehow. –  nemesisdesign Sep 4 '12 at 14:01
    
"while x < 40: x += 2; print x;" for example... –  nemesisdesign Sep 4 '12 at 14:19
1  
Not sure I understand your ZoP reference. What's implicit about the given code? –  Mark Thomas Sep 4 '12 at 16:23

With the remarks about assigment not being expressions in Python on the other answers kept, one can do this in Python:

from __future__ import print_function

[print(x) for x in range(0,42,2)]
share|improve this answer

a one-liner to produce the same result:

for x in xrange(4,42,2): print x

gives:

4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40

xrange is a built in function that returns an “xrange object”, which yields the next item without storing them all (like range does), this is very similar to OP's while loop.

share|improve this answer
    
"for i in xrange(4,42,2): print i" also –  nemesisdesign Sep 4 '12 at 14:26
    
@nemesisdesign even better :) –  zenpoy Sep 4 '12 at 14:28

This is not possible in python; you can't use a statement (x += 2) as an expression to be printed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.