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I'm having a Map object that could be null or simply cleared when the application first starts. I need all threads accessing this map to block till the map is initialized and only then I need to signal all threads to access this map.

This map holds configuration data and it will be for reading only unless a single threads decides to refresh to load new configuration data (So it doesn't need to Synchronized for the sake of performance as I don't find necessary too). I tried using a Condition object for a ReentrantLock but it threw IllegalMonitorState exceptions whenever I tried to signalAll() or await().

Here is a pseudo code for what I need to do:

void monitorThread{
    while(someCondition){
        map = updatedMap();
        condition.signalAll();
    }
}

String readValueFromMap(String key){
    if(map == null){
        condition.await();
    }
    return map.get(key);
}
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Are you sure you do not need a synchronize block? Seems if execution of if (map == null) is not atomic, some thread may miss wake up signal. –  Summer_More_More_Tea Sep 4 '12 at 13:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To do this right, you need a memory barrier hence the volatile. Because the map may be null initially, you are going to need another lock object. The following should work:

private final Object lockObject = new Object();
private volatile Map<...> map;

void monitorThread{
    while (condition){
        // do this outside of the synchronized in case it takes a while
        Map<...> updatedMap = updatedMap();
        synchronized (lockObject) {
           map = updatedMap;
           // notify everyone that may be waiting for the map to be initialized
           lockObject.notifyAll();
        }
    }
}

String readValueFromMap(String key) {
    // we grab a copy of the map to avoid race conditions in case the map is
    // updated in the future
    Map<...> mapRef = map;
    // we have a while loop here to handle spurious signals
    if (mapRef == null) {
        synchronized (lockObject) {
           while (map == null) {
               // wait for the map to initialized
               lockObject.wait();
           }
           mapRef = map;
        }
    }
    return mapRef.get(key);
}
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with map volatile, I'm not sure you need the copy –  assylias Sep 4 '12 at 13:54
    
Maybe not @assylias. I was worried that the update would happen again. –  Gray Sep 4 '12 at 13:55
    
The update will happen many times. Your solution would force that only one thread being able to read from the map which could hit the performance as the whole application uses this map for configuration values. Am I correct ? –  Muhammad Gelbana Sep 4 '12 at 16:08
    
No @muhammad, in my solution, if the map is null then the readers will all wait on the lockObject. Once the map is updated, they will all be notified. I just tweaked the while loop there. –  Gray Sep 4 '12 at 16:13
    
@Gray, ya it now looks it would work. You're having the wait() call in a loop as a defense mechanism, correct ? What do you think is foolproof and better with performance, you approach or AmitD's (I'll have to re-initialize the CountdownLatch object to sustain multiple map updates) ? Thank you. –  Muhammad Gelbana Sep 4 '12 at 16:17

CountDownLatch is all you need.

CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(1); 

While initialize hashmap do latch.countdown() and in threads use latch.await()

void monitorThread{
    map = updatedMap();
    latch.countDown();
}

String readValueFromMap(String key){
    latch.await();
    return map.get(key);
}

Please note that CountDownLatch await() method only waits if countdown is greater than 0 hence only first time.

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I did not downvote but you might want to add a few lines of explanations. –  assylias Sep 4 '12 at 13:43
    
I am adding it but typing from mobile so I was bit slow. –  AmitD Sep 4 '12 at 13:45
1  
OP wants to do it that way. –  AmitD Sep 4 '12 at 13:51
1  
+1 This does fail however if the user wants to create/update the map more then once. –  John Vint Sep 4 '12 at 14:19
1  
@MuhammadGelbana Are you using Java 7? If you are you can use a Phaser. It handles the 'recreate' part by using a phase (which is the current iteration of all parties arriving to a particular barrier). –  John Vint Sep 4 '12 at 16:09

Sounds like all you need is a "Lock" object that guards access to the Map.

These are pretty easy to use:

 Lock l = ...;
 l.lock();
 try {
     // access the resource protected by this lock
 } finally {
     l.unlock();
 }

You could probably use: java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantReadWriteLock.ReadLock

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