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I have a set of files which are text files, but contain the ASCII 0 SOH character.

Perforce sees these files as binary. Now, being honest, I don't care what it sees them as, however, recently we have had several occurrences of Perforce giving different people different versions after a new branch is integrated.

The GUI shows version say #2/#2 (two of two) on two peoples workspaces, but they have different versions. When these files are right clicked and diffed against the latest (having selected the character set in the popup to treat them as text), it shows the file as having differences. However, choosing "Get latest revision" or doing a "p4 sync ..." does not update the file.

I have tried setting the file type to "text" and committing and they remain text up until they get branched when they revert to binary.

Has anyone seen this behaviour?

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What are the versions for p4d and p4/p4v? Also, is it ASCII 0 or the SOH (typically ASCII 1) character? ASCII 0 is usually considered the NUL character. –  Goyuix Sep 4 '12 at 15:28
    
P4V version: LINUX26x86_64/2010.2/334844 P4 version: emm. no idea. Server: 2009.2/241896 –  user1646448 Sep 5 '12 at 10:57

1 Answer 1

I have tried setting the file type to "text" and committing and they remain text up until they get branched when they revert to binary.

If the target of an integrate/branch does not yet exist it gets the filetype of the original (in your case text). If it already exists (in your case probably binary) then the filetype change of the source file does not get integrated - in your case the target still has filetype "binary".

In order to integrate the filetype change from the source file to the target you need the "-t" option when calling "p4 integrate". It's good practice to always call "p4 integrate" with option "-t".

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