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I have a JSON object:

var txt = '{"employees":[' +
'{"firstName":"John","lastName":"Doe","time":"9:15am","email":"john_doe@gmail.com" },' +
'{"firstName":"Anna","lastName":"Smith","time":"9:15am","email":"anna@gmail.com" },' +
'{"firstName":"Peter","lastName":"Jones" ,"time":"9:15am","email":"peter@gmail.com"}]}';

That I want to print as a list in between div statements:

  • John Doe
  • 9:15am
  • john_doe@gmail.com

  • Anna Smith

  • 9:15am
  • anna@gmail.com

  • Peter Jones

  • 9:15am
  • peter@gmail.com

The HTML that I'm trying to populate looks like this:

    <div class="info">
        <ul>
            <li id="name"></li>
            <li id="time"></li>
            <li id="email"></li>
        </ul>
    </div>

How do I accomplish this?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<h2>Create Object from JSON String</h2>
<div id="output">

</div> 
<script type="text/javascript">
var txt = '{"employees":[' +
'{"firstName":"John","lastName":"Doe","time":"9:15am","email":"john_doe@gmail.com" },' +
'{"firstName":"Anna","lastName":"Smith","time":"9:15am","email":"anna@gmail.com" },' +
'{"firstName":"Peter","lastName":"Jones" ,"time":"9:15am","email":"peter@gmail.com"}]}';

var employees=JSON.parse(txt).employees;
var container=document.getElementById("output");

for (i=0;i<employees.length;i++) { //Loops for the length of the list
    var info=document.createElement('div');
    info.className='info'; //Creates a new <div> element and adds the class info to it

    var ul=document.createElement('div'); //Creates <ul> element
    info.appendChild(ul); //Adds the <ul> to the newly created <div>

    var name=document.createElement('li');
    name.className='name'; //Should use class, not id, as ID must be unique
    name.innerHTML=employees[i].firstName+' '+employees[i].lastName; //Adds name
    ul.appendChild(name);

    var time=document.createElement('li');
    time.className='time';
    time.innerHTML=employees[i].time;
    ul.appendChild(time);

    var email=document.createElement('li');
    email.className='email';
    email.innerHTML=employees[i].email;
    ul.appendChild(email);

    container.appendChild(info); //Adds the final generated HTML to the page

} //Will repeat for each item in list.

</script>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
Are you using jQuery? (Makes things easier, but is not absolutely necessary.) –  Brad Sep 4 '12 at 14:25
    
@Brad i would prefer to not use jquery –  Mike Sep 4 '12 at 14:25
2  
If you are planning on having multiple "info" groupings, you shouldn't use id's for name/time/email. –  Shmiddty Sep 4 '12 at 14:27
    
You should use class and not id to identify name, time and email as you will end up with multiple instances of them. –  Jasper de Vries Sep 4 '12 at 14:29
    
rlemon.github.com/FragBuilder.js might be useful for you –  rlemon Sep 5 '12 at 2:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First off, turn your string into an object:

var employees=JSON.parse(txt).employees;

Then, set up a loop to construct the HTML

var container=//Link to the containing element using getElementById or similar

for (i=0;i<employees.length;i++) { //Loops for the length of the list
    var info=document.createElement('div');
    info.className='info'; //Creates a new <div> element and adds the class info to it

    var ul=document.createElement('div'); //Creates <ul> element
    info.appendChild(ul); //Adds the <ul> to the newly created <div>

    var name1=document.createElement('li'); //Chrome seems not to like the variable "name" in this instance
    name1.className='name'; //Should use class, not id, as ID must be unique
    name1.innerHTML=employees[i].firstName+' '+employees[i].lastName; //Adds name
    ul.appendChild(name1);

    var time=document.createElement('li');
    time.className='time';
    time.innerHTML=employees[i].time;
    ul.appendChild(time);

    var email=document.createElement('li');
    email.className='email';
    email.innerHTML=employees[i].email;
    ul.appendChild(email);

    container.appendChild(info); //Displays the elements on the page

} //Will repeat for each item in list.

This could also be achieved using container.innerHTML, but constructing elements like that can confuse the DOM, so is usually only recommended for text nodes, though again ideally you'd use document.createTextNode().

share|improve this answer
    
this seems to work on jsfiddle, but not my local machine, is there any sort of library or API i need to download? –  Mike Sep 4 '12 at 15:03
    
The JSON object is built into Javascript, so you don't need to worry about any libraries for that. As for the rest, it's equally standards Javascript, so really it depends how you're implementing it. Note that running this straight off won't work, as the object you've referenced as container likely doesn't exist in the DOM yet; you'll have to wait for pageload to be complete at least. –  Death Sep 4 '12 at 15:06
    
in the original question is my test.html program, can you see if i am missing something? i cant seem to get it to work. –  Mike Sep 4 '12 at 15:16
    
I copied that, character-for-character, and loaded it as a .htm file; worked perfectly for me. What browser are you using? –  Death Sep 4 '12 at 15:19
    
i am using chrome –  Mike Sep 4 '12 at 15:20

First you get the array in the JSON string by parsing it:

var employees = JSON.parse(txt).employees

Then you create the HTML elements like this

var element = document.createElement('div'); // creates an empty div

And then you put the HTML tree together with

someElement.append(otherElement); // makes otherElement a child of someElement
share|improve this answer

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