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I have an two interfaces defined as follows:

public interface IFoo
{
...
}

Public interface IFooWrapper<T> where T : IFoo
{
  T Foo {get;}
}

I want to be able to declare a collection of IFooWrappers but I don't want to specify the implementation of IFoo.

Ideally I want to do something like the:

IList<IFooWrapper<*>> myList;

I can't figure out a way around this.

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4 Answers 4

public interface IFoo
{
...
}

public interface IFooWrapper : IFoo
{
...
}
public interface IFooWrapper<T> : IFooWrapper
 where T : IFoo
{
...
}
IList<IFooWrapper> myList;

this is a way to do what you want

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My first thought. –  Sam Harwell Aug 4 '09 at 9:50

What's wrong with

IList<IFooWrapper<IFoo>> myList?
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Indeed! List<IFooWrapper<IFoo>> myList = new List<IFooWrapper<IFoo>>(); –  locster Aug 4 '09 at 9:54
1  
Except that it won't work... for instance, IFooWrapper<Foo> doesn't inherit IFooWrapper<IFoo>, even if Foo implements IFoo... (except if you're using C# 4 which implements covariance) –  Thomas Levesque Aug 4 '09 at 10:00
1  
List<IFooWrapper<IFoo>> fooWrapperList = new List<IFooWrapper<IFoo>>(); IFooWrapper<IFoo> concreteWrapper = new ConcreteFooWrapper<IFoo>(); fooWrapperList.Add(concreteWrapper); –  locster Aug 4 '09 at 10:52
    
I appreciate the covariance issue. but the question was about a general iList. –  Preet Sangha Aug 4 '09 at 20:40
public class FooWrapper : IFooWrapper<IFoo>
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What I'm about to suggest is overkill for most situations, since usually you can create an interface higher up in the hierarchy that you can use. However, I think this is the most flexible solution in some ways, and the most faithful representation of what you want:

public interface IFooWrapperUser<U> {
    U Use<T>(IFooWrapper<T> wrapper);
}

public interface IFooWrapperUser {
    void Use<T>(IFooWrapper<T> wrapper);
}

public interface IExistsFooWrapper {
    U Apply<U>(IFooWrapperUser<U> user);
    void Apply(IFooWrapperUser user);
}

public class IExistsFooWrapper<T> : IExistsFooWrapper {
    private IFooWrapper<T> wrapper;
    public IExistsFoo(IFooWrapper<T> wrapper) {
        this.wrapper = wrapper;
    }

    public U Apply<U>(IFooWrapperUser<U> user) {
        return user.Use(foo);
    }

    public void Apply(IFooWrapperUser user) {
        user.Use(foo)
    }
}

Now you can create an instance of an IList<IExistsFooWrapper> which can be used as if it's an IList<IFooWrapper<*>>. The downside is you'll need to create a class to encapsulate the logic you want to run on each element:

private class FooPrinter : IFooWrapperUser<string> {
    public string Apply<T>(IFooWrapper<T> wrapper) {
        return wrapper.Foo.ToString();
    }
}

...
    IFooWrapperUser<string> user = new FooPrinter();
    foreach (IExistFooWrapper wrapper in list) {
        System.Console.WriteLine(wrapper.Apply(user));
    }

...
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