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I have a question about Operator Overloading in C++.

For an assignment, I have to write a class which encompasses an array, sort of like the ArrayList in Java.

One of the things I have to do is keep track of the size of the array. Size is the amount of elements included, whereas capacity is the maximum amount which CAN be included before the class has to expand the array.

Client code specifies the size when they call the constructor. However, when new elements are added, I have to figure out a way to change the size.

My teacher said something about being able to overload an operator for different sides of an equality. Is this a real thing, or did I misunderstand her? If this works, it would be the optimal solution to my problem.

My current overloading for the [] operator is:

int & ArrayWrapper::operator [] (int position){

if(position == _size){
    if(_size == _capacity){
        changeCapacity(_capacity+10);
    }
}
return _array[position];
}

This works fine for retrieval, but I'd like to have it so that if someone calls it from the left hand side of a '=' then it checks to see if it needs to expand the size or not.

EDIT: If this isn't a real thing, can anyone think of a different solution to the problem? One solution I thought of is to have the getSize() method just go through the entire array every time it is called, but I'd really rather not use that solution because it seems cheesy.

EDIT: For clarification, I'm not asking whether or not my expansion of an array works. I need to add 1 to size every time a new element is added. For example, if the client creates an array of size 15 and capacity 25, and then tries to add something to Array[15], that SHOULD increase the size to 16. I was wondering if there was a way to do that with overloading.

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2  
It sounds a bit strange. Do you mean if you construct it with size 10 and somebody asks for poisition 100000 you have to expand it to size 100001 and fill the elements between 10 and 99999 with something? –  juanchopanza Sep 4 '12 at 15:27
    
Yes, thats what he means. You need to account for the difference between what is asked for and your current vector size. –  WhozCraig Sep 4 '12 at 15:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A simple approach, which doesn't quite do what you want, is to overload on whether the array is const or mutable.

This doesn't distinguish between whether the array is being used on the left-hand side of assignment (as a lvalue) or on the right (as a rvalue); just on whether it's allowed to be modified or not.

// Mutable overload (returns a mutable reference)
int & operator[](size_t position) {
    if (position >= _size) {
        if (position >= _capatity) {
           // increase capacity
        }
        // increase size
    }
    return _array[position];
}

// Const overload (returns a value or const reference)
int operator[](size_t position) const {
    if (position >= _size) {
        throw std::out_of_range("Array position out of range");
    }
    return _array[position];
}

If you really want to tell whether you're being assigned to or not, then you'll have to return a proxy for the reference. This overloads assignment to write to the array, and provides a conversion operator to get the value of the element:

class proxy {
public:
    proxy(ArrayWrapper & array, size_t position) :
        _array(array), _position(position) {}

    operator int() const {
        if (_position >= _array._array._size) {            
            throw std::out_of_range("Array position out of range");
        }
        return _array._array[_position];
    }

    proxy & operator=(int value) {
        if (_position >= _size) {
            if (_position >= _capatity) {
                // increase capacity
            }
            // increase size
        }
        _array._array[_position] = value;
        return *this;
    }

private:
    ArrayWrapper & _array;
    size_t _position;
};

You probably need to declare this a friend of ArrayWrapper; then just return this from operator[]:

proxy ArrayWrapper::operator[](size_t position) {
    return proxy(*this, position);
}
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Thank you for such a detailed response. I'm not sure that I'm allowed to create another class in order to solve this problem, but if I am, I'll keep your answer in mind. –  user1646600 Sep 4 '12 at 15:48

This approach is fine. There's an error in the code, though: what happens if someone calls that operator with a position that's equal to the current size of the array plus 100?

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I'm supposed to write an exception for that case, however, I haven't gotten to it yet. When you say that my approach is fine, what do you mean? –  user1646600 Sep 4 '12 at 15:27
    
What he means, I think, is it does not matter if the [] operator appears on the left or on the right side of the statement. –  mah Sep 4 '12 at 15:28
    
Oops, sorry: misunderstood your question. As @mah said, this will work regardless of which side of an assignment the array is on. –  Pete Becker Sep 4 '12 at 15:31
    
That's not the problem. I would like it to matter. I want the operator to be overloaded differently if it appears on the left side on an equals sign. –  user1646600 Sep 4 '12 at 15:31
    
@user1646600 - what do you want to do differently depending on which side of an assignment it appears on? –  Pete Becker Sep 4 '12 at 15:33

The question is whether you really want different behavior depending on which side of the = you are. Your basic idea will work fine, but will expand the array regardless of the side you're on, e.g.:

ArrayWrapper a(10);
std::cout << a[20] << std::end;

will result in expanding the array. Most of the time, in such cases, the preferred behavior would be for the code above to raise an exception, but for

ArrayWrapper a(10);
a[20] = 3.14159;

to work. This is possible using proxies: first, you define double ArrayWrapper::get( int index ) const and void ArrayWrapper::set( int index, double newValue ); the getter will throw an exception if the index is out of bounds, but the setter will extend the array. Then, operator[] returns a proxy, along the lines of:

class ArrayWrapper::Proxy
{
    ArrayWrapper* myOwner;
    int           myIndex;
public:
    Proxy( ArrayWrapper& owner, int index )
        : myOwner( &owner )
        , myIndex( index )
    {
    }
    Proxy const& operator=( double newValue ) const
    {
        myOwner->set( myIndex, newValue );
    }
    operator double() const
    {
        return myOwner->get( myIndex );
    }
};

In case you're not familiar with the operator double(), it's an overloaded conversion operator. The way this works is that if the operator[] is on the left side of an assignment, it will actually be the proxy which gets assigned to, and the assignment operator of the proxy forwards to the set() function. Otherwise, the proxy will implicitly convert to double, and this conversion forwards to the get() function.

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Mike beat you to it by just a bit :P. I'm not sure I'm allowed to use this solution, because it doesn't seem like anything we've discussed related to this assignment. However, if I can't find any other way to solve my problem then I'll keep this in mind. –  user1646600 Sep 4 '12 at 15:51
    
@user1646600 Well it is a fairly standard solution. (It's interesting that he does the actual growing in the proxy, where as I do it in dedicated functions in the ArrayWrapper. Not that I think that makes any significant difference.) –  James Kanze Sep 4 '12 at 17:04

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