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I have a lump of SQL that looks a little like this

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.databases WHERE name = '{FOO}')
BEGIN
  EXECUTE ('CREATE DATABASE {FOO}')
  ALTER DATABASE {FOO} SET AUTO_CLOSE OFF
END

{FOO} is replaced at runtime with the name of a user configurable database. The logic is that I don't want to create the database if it already exists.

If {FOO} is tempdb then I get a failure when the query runs

Option 'AUTO_CLOSE' cannot be set in database 'tempdb'.

My question is why do I get this failure? SELECT * FROM sys.databases WHERE name = 'tempdb' returns zero results so surely my whole BEGIN/END pair shouldn't run? Indeed, if I put a print statement between begin and end, I don't see any output.

My guess is that SQL Server is doing some kind of linting on the SQL to make sure I don't muck around with tempdb? I have solved the problem by using EXECUTE instead, but I'm a little confused why I have to!

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like a parsing problem. Your code is currently broken - is the ALTER inside the string or not? If not, please try making it a part of the dynamic string. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 4 '12 at 16:15
    
Sorry, made a typo, I corrected that. The alter is part of the string. –  Jeff Foster Sep 4 '12 at 16:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try ensuring both commands are separate and within dynamic SQL, then the change to tempdb won't be caught by the parser:

EXEC sp_executesql N'CREATE DATABASE {FOO};';
EXEC sp_executesql N'ALTER DATABASE {FOO} SET AUTO_CLOSE OFF;';

This is similar to the reason you can't do this:

IF 1 = 1
BEGIN
  CREATE TABLE #t1(id INT);
END
ELSE
BEGIN
  CREATE TABLE #t1(x NVARCHAR(255));
END

Even though you and I know that only one of those #t1 code paths will ever be reached, SQL Server presumes that both paths could be reached at runtime, and so complains at parse time.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I know whether to use dynamic SQL or just use literal SQL? I'm confused as to the responsibilities of the parser, since it seems to be finding semantic errors in my code. –  Jeff Foster Sep 4 '12 at 16:17
1  
For things like this, where you're parameterizing things that can't be parameterized in normal SQL/DDL, you're safer to use dynamic SQL IMHO. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 4 '12 at 16:18

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