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I create this style and i have no idea how to make it works in IE and Firefox:

input[type="checkbox"]:before
{
    content:"";
    display:inline-block;
    background: url("../images/controls.png") 0% 5%, url("../images/controls.png") 0% 2.5%, white;
    display: block;
    width: 19px;
    height: 19px;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
input[type=checkbox]:hover:before
{
    background-position: 0% 10%;
}
input[type=checkbox]:checked:before
{
    background: url("../images/controls.png") 0% 15.1%, url("../images/controls.png") 0% 5%, white;
}

input[type="radio"]:before
{
    content:"";
    display:inline-block;
    background: url("../images/controls.png") 0% 2.5%, url("../images/controls.png") 0% 30.6%, white;
    display: block;
    width: 19px;
    height: 19px;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
input[type=radio]:hover:before
{
    background-position: 0% 35.6%;
}
input[type=radio]:checked:before
{
    background: url("../images/controls.png") 0% 40.6%, url("../images/controls.png") 0% 30.6%, white;
}

It's working perfectly in chrome and in safari. I tried to use the background-image, but don't work too. Could anyone help me with this? Thanks.

I'm using this image(controls.png):

share|improve this question
    
Actually, even if it looks cool, even if it's convenient, it shouldn't work. Technically, this is a bug in WebKit. –  Ana Sep 4 '12 at 16:54
    
Pseudo-elements exist in order to allow you to add content before and after an element's content (that is inside the element, before and after its content, not before and after the element itself), but a replaced element is a "no content" element. –  Ana Sep 4 '12 at 17:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You may have a look at Custom Crossbrowser Styling for Checkboxes and Radio Buttons

Hope this helps.

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3  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Tom Oct 4 '12 at 6:52

Browser support for multiple backgrounds is relatively widespread with all of the main browsers offering support, without the need for vendor prefixes. Firefox has supported multiple backgrounds since version 3.6 (Gecko 1.9.2), Safari since version 1.3, Chrome since version 10, Opera since version 10.50 (Presto 2.5) and Internet Explorer since version 9.0.

From http://www.css3.info/preview/multiple-backgrounds/

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