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The documentation for ggplot2's stat_bin function states that it returns a new data frame with additional columns. How does one actually get access to this data frame?

Is it possible?

simple <- data.frame(x = rep(1:10, each = 2))
tmp <- stat_bin(data=simple, binwidth=0.1, aes(x))

I have figured out that tmp is an environment, and ls(tmp) will show what objects are in the environment, but after exploring each of these objects, I'm not seeing anything like what is described as a return value.

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I'm not sure, I think that the calculation are done when your print it and it isn't easlly accesible to the user. –  Luciano Selzer Sep 4 '12 at 17:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

As Luciano Selzer mentions, the calculations that produce the table shown below aren't performed until print time. (A look at ggplot2:::print.ggplot() will show that, in its final line, it returns the table invisibly, so it can be captured by assignment for further examination.)

tmp <- ggplot(data=simple) + stat_bin(aes(x), binwidth=0.1)
x <- print(tmp)
head(x[["data"]][[1]])
#   y count    x ndensity ncount density PANEL group ymin ymax xmin xmax
# 1 0     0 0.95        0      0       0     1     1    0    0  0.9  1.0
# 2 2     2 1.05        1      1       1     1     1    0    2  1.0  1.1
# 3 0     0 1.15        0      0       0     1     1    0    0  1.1  1.2
# 4 0     0 1.25        0      0       0     1     1    0    0  1.2  1.3
# 5 0     0 1.35        0      0       0     1     1    0    0  1.3  1.4
# 6 0     0 1.45        0      0       0     1     1    0    0  1.4  1.5
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The returned data.frame doesn't exist until paired with a ggplot call and "printed"? From the OPs example, get('data', env=tmp) returns just the passed in sample data.frame. –  Justin Sep 4 '12 at 17:11
    
Partly, yes. But it still doesn't seem to fit what R means when it says it returns a value. It just doesn't seem like it should be so hard to get at values generated by a function. –  rmflight Sep 4 '12 at 17:12
    
In contrast, I can do tmp <- hist(simple, breaks=100, plot=F) and have access to everything in a list in tmp –  rmflight Sep 4 '12 at 17:14
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@rmflight These are good points about the docs. If I have some free time this weekend, I'll try to add a pull request to address them. –  joran Sep 4 '12 at 19:08
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There's not much point in trying to document the existing internals because even I don't understand them very well. For the next release Winston and I will be working on a re-write that should be simpler and easier to extend (and it will be possible to call all stat functions to get the results outside of a plot) –  hadley Sep 4 '12 at 20:40

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