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Here's the thing. A colleague of mine is trying to overwrite the session handling of a framework that we use. This framework uses PHP's own native session handling by default, but he is now trying to implement a database layer between the requests.

Problem is that the database object is not available by the time sessions are written anymore, yet it is available for other functions such as when data is read from sessions. This is a wild behavior. Here's what we did:

register_shutdown_function('exithandler'); 

session_set_save_handler(
    'sess_open',
    'sess_close',
    'sess_read',
    'sess_write',
    'sess_destroy',
    'sess_gc'
);

Each of those functions also writes a single line to our log file that we can track with the name of the function. This is done whenever the function is called. Now here are two URL's that are requested, the first one is where sessions are actually written (new data to the sessions) and the second one where session data is just checked (and none is written). Here's the puzzle:

/login/
sess_open
sess_read
exithandler
sess_write
sess_close

/account/
sess_open
sess_read
sess_write
sess_close
exithandler

Why is this behavior different? Why is the exit handler called before data is stored in sessions and why is the same not true for a regular page, even though the same methods are indeed called?

Problem is that none of our classes are available anymore after the exithandler is called, I assume that PHP garbage collector has called __destruct() methods on all of our classes and they are gone. This is just bad.

Anyone knows why PHP behaves this way?

share|improve this question
1  
What version of PHP are you using? –  cillosis Sep 4 '12 at 17:18
    
I've tested this using PHP 5.4, and I can only reproduce the first order of operations for both types of requests: Reading and writing session data. –  nickb Sep 4 '12 at 17:22
1  
There is a common issue with some version of PHP that require you to add a line prior to calling session_set_save_handler(). Use this first: register_shutdown_function('session_write_close') and see if that fixes your unstable behavior. –  cillosis Sep 4 '12 at 17:28
1  
I'd guess that the differences are caused by objects destroyed in one case by reference counting dropping to zero and in another case during PHP shutdown sequence and in that case all destructors are called in "random" order (I believe that the actual order is the original memory allocation order but this is not documented anywhere so it could change). php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.decon.php –  Mikko Rantalainen Feb 8 '13 at 7:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As your comments say PHP5.4, you may want to take a look at the SessionHandlerInterface(). You can pass the register_shutdown_function in the open() method to semi-automate the process and really take advantage of the PHP5.4 features.

<?php
class MySessionHandler implements SessionHandlerInterface
{
    private $savePath;

    public function open($savePath, $sessionName)
    {
        register_shutdown_function('session_write_close');
        $this->savePath = $savePath;
        if (!is_dir($this->savePath)) {
            mkdir($this->savePath, 0777);
        }

        return true;
    }

    public function close()
    {
        return true;
    }

    public function read($id)
    {
        return (string)@file_get_contents("$this->savePath/sess_$id");
    }

    public function write($id, $data)
    {
        return file_put_contents("$this->savePath/sess_$id", $data) === false ? false : true;
    }

    public function destroy($id)
    {
        $file = "$this->savePath/sess_$id";
        if (file_exists($file)) {
            unlink($file);
        }

        return true;
    }

    public function gc($maxlifetime)
    {
        foreach (glob("$this->savePath/sess_*") as $file) {
            if (filemtime($file) + $maxlifetime < time() && file_exists($file)) {
                unlink($file);
            }
        }

        return true;
    }
}

$handler = new MySessionHandler();
session_set_save_handler($handler, true);
session_start();
share|improve this answer
    
Sadly my framework requires PHP 5.3 and I ended up doing a custom session handler that was more suitable for my needs. But your answer is technically a 'correct answer', despite requiring PHP 5.4 to work. –  kristovaher Sep 7 '12 at 9:17
    
Does register_shutdown_handler() work well inside Classes? –  Anish Nair May 13 '13 at 5:41

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