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My Question is very simple, how is getline(istream, string) implemented? How can you solve the problem of having fixed size char arrays like with getline (char* s, streamsize n ) ? Are they using temporary buffers and many calls to new char[length] or another neat structure?

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3  
Implementation-defined, but probably a fixed-size char array and string::append when it gets full or you get to the end of the line. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 4 '12 at 17:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

getline(istream&, string&) is implemented in a way that it reads a line. There is no definitive implementation for it; each library probably differs from one another.

Possible implementation:

istream& getline(istream& stream, string& str)
{
  char ch;
  str.clear();
  while (stream.get(ch) && ch != '\n')
    str.push_back(ch);
  return stream;
}
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So the class string uses a fixed buffer and resizes this buffer if nesseray? –  mjjoker Sep 4 '12 at 17:34
3  
@mjjoker yes... –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 4 '12 at 17:35
    
So they probably use a neat typ of structure or are you talking of arrays which is automatically resized? –  mjjoker Sep 4 '12 at 17:39
    
@mjjoker it's just dynamic arrays (new[]) like vector uses internally. (This is why I say teach the C of C++ before the ++ (either that or trolling)) –  Seth Carnegie Sep 4 '12 at 17:41
    
I agree with you, but even if you use new[] you have a fixed size! You can recall it and change the size of the array but you have a size! –  mjjoker Sep 4 '12 at 17:56

@SethCarnegie is right: more than one implementation is possible. The C++ standard does not say which should be used.

However, the question is still interesting. It's a classic computer-science problem. Where, and how, does one allocate memory when one does not know in advance how much memory to allocate?

  1. One solution is to record the string's characters as a linked list of individual characters. This is neither memory-efficient nor fast, but it works, is robust, and is relatively simple to program. However, a standard library is unlikely to be implemented this way.

  2. A second solution is to allocate a buffer of some fixed length, such as 128 characters. When the buffer overflows, you allocate a new buffer of double length, 256 characters, then copy the old characters over to the new storage, then release the old. When the new buffer overflows, you allocate an even newer buffer of double length again, 512 characters, then repeat the process; and so on.

  3. A third solution combines the first two. A linked list of character arrays is maintained. The first two members of the list store (say) 128 characters each. The third stores 256. The fourth stores 512, and so on. This requires more programming than the others, but may be preferable to either, depending on the application.

And the list of possible implementations goes on.

Regarding standard-library implementations, @SteveJessop adds that "[a] standard library's string isn't permitted to be implemented as (1), because of the complexity requirement of operator[] for strings. In C++11 it's not permitted to be implemented as (3) either, because of the contiguity requirement for strings. The C++ committee expressed the belief that no active C++ implementation did (3) at the time they added the contiguity requirement. Of course, getline can do what it likes temporarily with the characters before adding them all to the string, but the standard does say a lot about what string can do."

The addition is relevant because, although getline could temporarily store its data in any of several ways, if the data's ultimate target is a string, this may be relevant to getline's implementation. @SteveJessop further adds, "For string itself, implementations are pretty much required to be (2) except that they can choose their own rate of expansion; they don't have to double each time as long as they multiply by some constant."

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@SethCarnegie: Thanks for the good edit. –  thb Sep 4 '12 at 17:51
1  
A standard library's string isn't permitted to be implemented as (1), because of the complexity requirement of operator[] for strings. In C++11 it's not permitted to be implemented as (3) either, because of the contiguity requirement for strings. The C++ committee expressed the belief that no active C++ implementation did (3) at the time they added the contiguity requirement. Of course, getline can do what it likes temporarily with the characters before adding them all to the string, but the standard does say a lot about what string can do. –  Steve Jessop Sep 4 '12 at 18:11
1  
@SteveJessop he's talking about the implementation of getline I am thinking, not of string. Also thb, for any implementation number n, there is always an implementation n + 1 :) –  Seth Carnegie Sep 4 '12 at 18:18
1  
The reason I made it a comment is that the question asks how getline can be implemented, and I'm just remarking how string must be implemented in C++. What you say is still true of the classic computer-science problem, and getline could do any of the things you say, and then at the end it could copy all the characters from its own data-structure into a string. For string itself, implementations are pretty much required to be (2) except that they can choose their own rate of expansion, they don't have to double each time as long as they multiply by some constant. –  Steve Jessop Sep 4 '12 at 18:23
1  
So while there probably is a 4, it will look fairly 2-ish around the edges :-) For example the "small string optimization" is sometimes used, and an implementation is permitted (although I don't specifically remember hearing of any) to do implementation-specific things that will use memory more efficiently provided that ::operator new hasn't been overridden by the user. For example, it could ask for sizes that it "just so happens" to know are convenient for the system's malloc implementation, so as hopefully not to waste bytes at the end of blocks. –  Steve Jessop Sep 4 '12 at 18:24

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