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I'm working with an array of strings, and would like to do the following:

//Regex regex; List<string> strList; List<string> strList2; 
foreach (string str in strList){
    if (regex.IsMatch(str)) {      //only need in new array if matches...
        strList2.Add(regex.Replace(str, myMatchEvaluator)) 
                                   //but still have to apply transformation
    }
}

Now, I know that works, but that effectively means running the same regex twice on each string in the array. Is there a way to collapse both of these steps - the filtering and the transformation - into one regex-parsing call?

(One that would work most of the time is

string str2 = regex.Replace(str, myMatchEvaluator);
if (str2 == str)
    strList2.Add(str2);

But that would often throw out some valid matches that still didn't need replacement.)

EDIT: A regex example, roughly similar to mine, to illustrate why this is tricky: Imagine looking for words at the beginning of lines in a log file, and wanting to capitalize them.

The regex would be new Regex("^[a-z]+", RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhiteSpace), and the replacement function would be match => match.ToUpper().

Now some first words are already capitalized, and I don't want to throw them away. On the other hand, I don't want to upper-case all instances of the word on the line, just the first one.

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Do you have performance problems ? –  Raphaël Althaus Sep 4 '12 at 17:56
    
Not right now, but I could in the future. It also looks a tad clunky and repetitive, especially when I have to do three regex filter/transforms on the same string (though that I could solve by wrapping is as a function.) –  Arithmomaniac Sep 4 '12 at 17:59

4 Answers 4

You can use a lambda function as match evaluator that updates a list of words.

IEnumerable<string> Replaces(string source)
{
    var rx = new Regex(@"\w+m", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase); // match words ending with 'm'
    var result = new List<string>(); 
    rx.Replace(source, m => { result.Add(m.ToString().ToUpper()); return m.ToString(); });
    return result;
}

    List<string> GetReplacements(List<string> sources) {
        var rx = new Regex(@"\w+m", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase); // match words ending with 'm'.
        var replacements = new List<string>(sources.Count);   // no need to allocate more space than needed.

        foreach(string source in sources) 
            // for each string in sources that matches 'rx', add the ToUpper() version to the result and replace 'source' with itself.
            rx.Replace(source, m  => {replacements.Add(m.ToString().ToUpper()); return m.ToString(); });

        return replacements;
    }

    List<string> GetReplacements2(List<string> sources) {
        var rx = new Regex(@"\w+m", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase); // match words ending with 'm'.
        var replacements = new List<string>(sources.Count);   // no need to allocate more space than needed.

        foreach(string source in sources) {
            var m = rx.Match(source);                         // do one rx match
            if (m.Success)                                    // if successfull
                replacements.Add(m.ToString().ToUpper());     // add to result.
        }

        return replacements;
    }

If you need to modify the original source and gather the unmodified matches then swap the parts in the lambda expression.

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I thought this would work, but then I realized - wouldn't that add a different string to result for every match of the regex, whereas my problem spec is to add the string after a global replace? –  Arithmomaniac Sep 5 '12 at 16:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Building off of all of the answers I've received, the following works:

void AddToIfMatch(List<string> list, string str; Regex regex; 
                                        MatchEvaluator evaluator)
{
    bool hasBeenEvaluated = false;
    string str2 = regex.Replace(
        str, 
        m => {HasBeenEvaluated = true; return evaluator(m);}
    );
    if( hasBeenEvaluated ) {list.Add(str2);}
}
share|improve this answer

Would something like this work ?

foreach (string str in strList)
{
    str = regex.Replace(str, delegate(Match thisMatch) {
        // only gets here if matched the regex already
        string str2 = yourReplacementFunction(thisMatch);  
        strList2.Add(str2);

        return thisMatch.Value;

    }); 
}
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No, it would fall prey to the second problem in the example I just added :( –  Arithmomaniac Sep 4 '12 at 18:27

you can create your own match evaluator:

private class DetectEvaluator {
    public bool HasBeenAvaluated { get; private set }
    private MatchEvaluator evaluator;
    public DetectEvaluator(MatchEvaluator evaluator) { 
        HasBeenAvaluated = false;
        this.evaluator = evaluator;
    }
    public string Evaluate(Match m) {
        HasBeenAvaluated = true;
        return evaluator(m);
    }
}

and then create a new one for every of your checks:

var de1 = new DetectEvaluator(myMatchEvaluator);
string str2 = regex.Replace(str, de1.Evaluate);
if( de1.HasBeenEvaluated ) strList2.Add(str2);

but I do not see improved readability here.

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