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I am trying to call Powershell with the Exec method of the WshShell object. I am writing the script in JScript, but I have reproduced the problem in VBScript as well. Both of the following short test scripts will cause WSH to hang indefinitely:

test.js

var shell = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");
WScript.Echo(shell.exec("powershell -Command $Host.Version; Exit").StdOut.ReadAll());

test.vbs

dim shell

set shell = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
WScript.Echo shell.exec("powershell -Command $Host.Version; Exit").StdOut.ReadAll

Am I doing something wrong, or am I running into or a limitation/incompatibility? The Run method works very well, but I need to capture output, which it's not capable of doing.

Edit: I forgot to mention that my platform is Windows 7 Pro, 64-bit with PowerShell 3. I've tested on Windows XP with PowerShell 1 as well.

Edit 2: I've updated the test scripts that I'm running to fit with x0n's answer. Unfortunately, I'm still having trouble. Here are my current tests:

test.js:

var shell = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");
WScript.Echo(shell.exec('powershell -noninteractive -noprofile -Command "& { echo Hello_World ; Exit }"').StdOut.ReadAll());

test.vbs:

dim shell

set shell = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
WScript.Echo shell.exec("powershell -noninteractive -noprofile -Command ""& { echo Hello_World ; Exit }""").StdOut.ReadAll
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have to close StdIn:

var shell = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");
var exec = shell.Exec('powershell -noninteractive -noprofile -Command "& { echo Hello_World ; Exit }"');
exec.StdIn.Close();
WScript.Echo(exec.StdOut.ReadAll());

Microsoft said:

StdIn is still open so PowerShell is waiting for input. (This is an
"implementation consideration" that we're hoping to fix in V2. The
PowerShell executable gathers all input before processing.) So
objexec.StdIn.Close() needs to be added.
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Excellent, that worked. Thank you. –  bshacklett Nov 23 '12 at 17:39
1  
You don't have to close StdIn. But you do need to use the -NonInteractive and -Command parameters in order for this to succeed. But I up-voted your answer because closing StdIn won't hurt and ultimately, I got this to work. Thanks for posting!! –  fourpastmidnight Aug 4 '13 at 3:16

Use:

powershell.exe -noninteractive -noprofile -command $host.version

as your string. For more complicated groups of commands, use this syntax:

powershell.exe -noninteractive -noprofile -command "& { $host.version; $host.version }"
share|improve this answer
    
I tried your recommendation, but unfortunately it did not resolve the problem. I ran it in wscript.exe and I found that the powershell window just stayed open, but it was completely blank. Closing this window allowed the WSH script to continue execution. I tested this on both the Windows 7 and XP computers. –  bshacklett Sep 5 '12 at 17:37

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