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I´ve made a program that does the (usually called) hailstone sequence, The program basically does this:

creates an int (value) and assign it a value.

If the int is even, divide it by two.

If the int is odd, multiply it by three and add one. Continue this process until n is equal to one.

it seems to be working fine with most numbers, but this number 99888769, the app hangs on a negative integer. Why is this?, they say that no-one has yet been able to proove that it stops, I´m not expecting I have solved that. But would be interesting to know why my app stops. -

    private void hailStoneSequence(){
    int value = 99888769;
    int i = 0;
    boolean trueOrFalse = isOddOrEven (value);
    while (value != 1){
        while (trueOrFalse == true && value != 1){
            i++;
            int previousValue = value;
            value = value / 2;
            println( previousValue +" is even, so I take half: "+value);
            trueOrFalse = isOddOrEven (value); // returning true or false, and inserting the newly divided number. So that it breaks loop when nescesary.
        }
            while (trueOrFalse == false && value != 1){
                i++;
                int previousValue = value;
                value = (value * 3) + 1;
                println (previousValue +" is odd, so I make 3n+1: "+value); 
                trueOrFalse = isOddOrEven (value);  
            }
                }       
    println ("\n\nThe process took "+i+" to reach "+value);
}

private boolean isOddOrEven(int value){
    /*
     * Takes an value and returns true, if that number is even.
     * Else it returns false.
     */
    if (value % 2 != 0){
    return false;
    }else{
        return true;
    }
}

}

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3  
As a minor note: your isOddOrEven() method and trueOrFalse variable have odd names. It's much better to name boolean functions and boolean variables as phrases asserting the positive form. For example, if your variable was named isOdd, then when the value is odd, isOdd would be true and if the value is even, isOdd would be false. This makes reading the code much easier. –  Daniel Pryden Sep 4 '12 at 20:29
    
Noted... I can see what you mean, they are not very readable. –  Tom Lilletveit Sep 4 '12 at 20:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As you keep increasing ints, they will eventually (in what might seem like a startling behavior) become negative because you are surpassing the maximum value of the int type (2^31-1), i.e. you end up changing the bit (of the int's binary representation) that is used to store the sign of the number. Use long instead.

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Correct! changed the int´s to, long... and it dont crash but -kinda saddened I did not solve this age old mathematical puzzle. –  Tom Lilletveit Sep 4 '12 at 20:35
    
Heh yea well people have been trying for a while, so don't be sad :-) –  arshajii Sep 4 '12 at 20:37

You actually picked an interesting starting number. Starting there, you eventually get to the number: 768879215. Multiplying this by 3 and adding 1 goes over the maximum value that an int can store (2^31-1), so it "overflows" into a negative number. The hailstone sequence does not always converge to 1 for negative numbers, and in fact in this case it repeats the following sequence forever:

-122
-61
-182
-91
-272
-136
-68
-34
-17
-50
-25
-74
-37
-110
-55
-164
-82
-41
-122

You can use long instead and your code will work up to (2^63-1), or use the BigInteger class and it will work for any number.

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Because your integer overflows. Use "long" instead, and your code will run fine, at least until your sequence even exceeds longs range.

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1  
or use BigInteger and always get accurate results (or no result). –  ddyer Sep 4 '12 at 20:32

Your logic seems convoluted to me. Re-write your code to be cleaner and you should be able to see what is going on:

public class HailStoneSequence {

    public void sequence() {
        int value = 99888769;
        int i = 0;
        while (value != 1) {
            int previousValue = value;
            if (value % 2 == 0) {
                value = value / 2;
                System.out.println(previousValue + " is even, so I take half: " + value);
            } else {
                value = (value * 3) + 1;
                System.out.println(previousValue + " is odd, so I make 3n+1: " + value);
            }
        }

        i++;
        System.out.println("\n\nThe process took " + i + " to reach " + value);
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        HailStoneSequence instance = new HailStoneSequence();
        instance.sequence();
    }

}

Now if you run it you should see not that it stops, but it repeats. Thus, it generates an infinite series....

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Your initial seed value causes you to reach an integer overflow for the "int" data type. This causes a repeating sequence of negative values. You can either change to use the "long" data type or start with a different (smaller) seed value.

public class HailStoneSequence 
{

    public static void processSequence()
    {
        long value = 99888769;   // works due to larger type range
        // int value = 99888769; // causes negative repeating sequence
        // int value = 81;       // works with smaller seed
        int i=0;

        while(value != 1)
        {
            System.out.println("The value is:" + value);
            i++;
            if(value % 2 == 0)
            {
                value /= 2;
            }
            else
            {
                value = value * 3 + 1;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("The process took " + i + " iterations to solve.");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        System.out.println("Begin Hailstorm:");
        HailStoneSequence.processSequence();
        System.out.println("End Hailstorm:");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! this makes my code feel dirty. –  Tom Lilletveit Sep 4 '12 at 20:54

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