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I'm trying to bring in different locale translations for ext.js. A majority of the ext.js translations come with only the language identified (ext-lang-fr.js). However my portal is always going to offer me the language/country for the locale when I look at it to decide which translation file to include. I have a limited set of languages to support. Is there a existing java library that encapsulates the logic for deciding the most specific file found in a list.

for example if my supporting language files are identified with : {de,en,es,fr,it,pt_PT,zh_CN} if request.getLocale() responded with 'fr_FR', then it would respond with the specific 'fr' in my list. If I had passed a value not on the list, it would respond with some default value.

Obviously I could parse the strings myself/write my own etc, but I was wondering if there as a standard and robust way to do this?

Marc

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is something, if you use Java 6 or newer. Obviously they had to implement this kind of Locales hierarchy to load strings from properties files. You can use ResourceBundle.Control to obtain hierarchical list of Locales:

Control control = Control.getControl(Control.FORMAT_DEFAULT);
List<Locale> locales = control.getCandidateLocales("messages",
Locale.forLanguageTag("zh-HK"));
for (Locale locale : locales) {
    System.out.println(locale.toLanguageTag());
}

This will return (Java 7):

zh-Hant-HK
zh-Hant
zh-HK
zh
und

Where "und" means "undefined". It is even better, for you may actually build the names of your files:

Control control = Control.getControl(Control.FORMAT_DEFAULT);
List<Locale> locales = control.getCandidateLocales("messages",
Locale.forLanguageTag("pl-PL"));
for (Locale locale : locales) {
    String bundleName = control.toBundleName("messages", locale);
    System.out.println(bundleName);
    String resourceName = control.toResourceName(bundleName, "properties");
    System.out.println(resourceName);
}

And the result is:

messages_pl_PL
messages_pl_PL.properties
messages_pl
messages_pl.properties
messages
messages.properties

Of course you need to know whether or not specific file exists, but this one should be pretty straightforward.

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Thanks Pawel, This is exactly what I was looking for. I don't know how I missed the control inner class. –  Marc Sep 5 '12 at 14:34

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