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What's the proper way to catch errors in my class, and have error messages "bubble up" from the class, to the view, and finally be display on the template?

The problem I have now, is I end up catching the same errors twice, in both my models and view controllers. This doesn't feel right.

Here's an example:

model/user.py

class User(object):
   errors = []

  def __init__(self, string=None):
    """ Initialize the user object
    """

    #See if the input string is an e-mail address
    try:
      string_is_email = string.index('@')
    except ValueError:
      self.errors.append('Invalid e-mail address')
      raise ValueError

view/login.py

@app.route('/login', methods=['POST', 'GET'])
def login():
  if request.method == 'POST':

    email = request.form['email']
    password = request.form['password']

    #Catch invalid e-mails
    try:
      u = User(email)
    except ValueError:
      errors = u.errors

  #In case the user hasn't POSTED
  try:
    errors = u.errors
  except:
    errors = None

  return render_template('login.html', error=errors)

templates/login.html

    {% if error %}
    <div class="error">
      <ul>
        {% for message in error %}
        <li>{{ message }}</li>
        {% endfor %}
      </ul>
    </div>

Is there a cleaner way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
I dont think you need the try/except in the models/user.py ... since errors will automagically bubble up if not caught – Joran Beasley Sep 4 '12 at 20:57
    
I'm really doing that to set an error message. If I don't have that try/except in there, I'd have to put the message in the view. But then if I use the class in another view, I'd have to duplicate the code – ensnare Sep 4 '12 at 20:58

Instead of that errors hack, you can directly send the message to the template with flash. Furthermore, I would modify it a bit:

class User(object):
  def __init__(self, string):
    """ Initialize the user object
    """

    #See if the input string is an e-mail address
    try:
      string_is_email = string.index('@')
    except ValueError:
      raise ValueError('Invalid e-mail address')

@app.route('/login', methods=['POST', 'GET'])
def login():
  if request.method == 'POST':

    email = request.form['email']
    password = request.form['password']

    #Catch invalid e-mails
    try:
      u = User(email)
    except ValueError, e:
      flash(e.message)

On how to use flash, have a look into the documentation: http://flask.pocoo.org/docs/patterns/flashing/.

share|improve this answer
    
So it's necessary to catch the same error in both places (in the class, and in the controller?) – ensnare Sep 4 '12 at 21:02
    
No, but it makes the most sense and this code allows you to throw different ValueErrors with different messages and you have to catch them just once. – dav1d Sep 4 '12 at 21:07

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