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I'm running the following code in my .emacs file:

(defun load-hooks ()
    (add-hook 'after-save-hook 'my-hook))

(add-hook 'c-mode-hook 'load-hooks)

(defun my-hook () ... )

However, the content in my-hook is running on save even when I'm in a different mode. Am I missing a step?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should use the LOCAL argument to add-hook, which will make sure that the hook only affects the current buffer:

(defun load-hooks ()
  (add-hook 'after-save-hook 'my-hook nil t))

(add-hook 'c-mode-hook 'load-hooks)

(defun my-hook () ...)
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So much better than my answer. –  sdasdadas Sep 4 '12 at 21:42

I think that calling (add-hook 'after-save-hook 'my-hook) in load-hooks adds the hook to all modes. That is, once that function is called, after-save-hook is modified for every other buffer as well.

I suspect that your hook would not be run unless you open a c file. Try opening some file without having opened any c files and see if anything is run. If it isn't it just means that the function that runs for c files modifies the save hook for everything else.

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Bang on - is there anyway I can create a after-save for c-mode only hook? –  sdasdadas Sep 4 '12 at 21:13
    
I am now testing if the current mode is in c-mode. I will post an answer. –  sdasdadas Sep 4 '12 at 21:27

Tikhon was correct about the 'after-save-hook affecting all modes - I am now relying on a check using the following functions:

(defun in-c-mode? ()
  (string= (current-major-mode) "c-mode"))

(defun current-major-mode ()
  (with-current-buffer (current-buffer) major-mode))
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2  
There's no need to define two new functions for this. I think (eq major-mode 'c-mode) should be a sufficient test. Note that (with-current-buffer (current-buffer) ...) is redundant, and is basically equivalent to (progn ...). –  Ryan Thompson Sep 4 '12 at 21:38
    
Thanks, it turns out that my answer was doubly redundant and I can pass an argument for local hooks. –  sdasdadas Sep 4 '12 at 21:49

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