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I have three tables:

Address

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `main`.`address` (  
  `id` BIGINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,  
  `street_number` VARCHAR(5) NOT NULL ,  
  `street_name` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL ,  
  `town_village` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL ,  
  `county` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL ,  
  `country` VARCHAR(45) NOT NULL ,  
  `postcode` VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL ,  
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`) ,  
  UNIQUE INDEX `street_number_UNIQUE` (`street_number` ASC, `street_name` ASC, `town_village` ASC,   `county` ASC, `country` ASC, `postcode` ASC) )  
ENGINE = InnoDB  

**Geolocation**  
CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `warrington_main`.`address` (  
  `id` BIGINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,  
  `street_number` VARCHAR(5) NOT NULL ,  
  `street_name` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL ,  
  `town_village` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL ,  
  `county` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL ,  
  `country` VARCHAR(45) NOT NULL ,  
  `postcode` VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL ,  
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`) ,  
  UNIQUE INDEX `street_number_UNIQUE` (`street_number` ASC, `street_name` ASC, `town_village` ASC,   `county` ASC, `country` ASC, `postcode` ASC) )  
ENGINE = InnoDB

**Image**  
CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `warrington_main`.`image` (  
  `id` MEDIUMINT(8) UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,  
  `alias_title` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL ,  
  `title` VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL ,  
  `description` VARCHAR(2000) NOT NULL ,  
  `main_image` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL ,  
  `thumbnail_image` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL ,  
  `thumbnail_image_medium` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL ,  
  `thumbnail_image_small` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL ,  
  `thumbnail_image_gallery` VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL ,    
  `hits` BIGINT(20) UNSIGNED NOT NULL DEFAULT '0' ,  
  `show_comment` ENUM('0','1') NOT NULL ,  
  `section` TINYINT(2) UNSIGNED NOT NULL ,  
  `flickr_youtube_id` VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL ,  
  `feature_in_gallery` ENUM('0','1') NOT NULL ,  
  `created_on` DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00' ,  
  `date_taken` DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00' ,  
  `updated_on` DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00' ,  
  `updated_by` MEDIUMINT(8) UNSIGNED NOT NULL ,  
  `approved` ENUM('Inprocess','Yes','No') NOT NULL DEFAULT 'Inprocess' ,  
  `visible` ENUM('0','1') NOT NULL DEFAULT '0' ,  
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`) ,  
  UNIQUE INDEX `alias_title` (`alias_title` ASC) ,  
  UNIQUE INDEX `flickr_youtube_id`   (`flickr_youtube_id` ASC) ,  
  INDEX `title` (`title` ASC) ,  
  INDEX `approved` (`approved` ASC) ,  
  INDEX `visible` (`visible` ASC) ,  
  INDEX `feature_in_gallery` (`feature_in_gallery` ASC) )  
ENGINE = InnoDB  
AUTO_INCREMENT = 23162  
DEFAULT CHARACTER SET = utf8  

Now each image could have a geolocation and a address. I was going to create another table called location.

I was going to create location with optional relationship for geolocation and address. So in other words a location could be a geolocation or address or both. I would not want to store null/null though. First question is how would i create a table with two optional relationship in this instance and ensure i dont get null/null.

I then need to associate the location table to the image table. I may want to do query in the future against a location or address/ or geocode against another table i.e. an event.

so an event may have a location that the same as a location stored in the image table. Does someone know if this is the best structure. An image table/ address/ geolocation and then a loocation and image table.

In other words i have a table that would consist of two optional relationship to geolocation and address. I would need either one to included in the table though and not both null. How can i enforce this contraint

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2 Answers 2

I see two way you could structure this. Either image would have foreign keys to address and geolocation. Or you could have image only have foreign key for a new location table which in turn has foreign key relations to address and geolocation. Which you want to do may depend on whether you expect to have other sorts of location types in the future. I would personally opt for the first unless there was other common properties of geolocation and address that you would like to place on a separate location, or you thought you were going to have a different location type in the future as mentioned.

In either case, whichever field has the address and geolocation foreign keys in it could also simply have a unique index across both fields. This would (mostly) enforce the desired relationships in that you could allow the fields to hold NULL values and you would then have at most one NULL-NULL record in that table.

Either that or you could strictly enforce the relationship if you simply denormalize the address and geolocation tables and add a column type to indicate which type it is (address,geolocation, or both) since it appears that data structures for both table is the same. You would then make the foreign key to this table in image be not null, and, if using innodb, optionally enforce referential integrity. Of course this would limit you to one actual address (i.e. not different address and geolocation addresses).

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I would like to opt for the second option in order for me to search across other tables in the future. I.e. an event may have a location the same as an image. I could then look up events and image with the same location/ address or geocode. If i created a relationship in image to geocode and address it would be very difficult to see which event had the same geocode and address. I do need to ensure referential integrity however but a location could have either an optional address or optional geolocation. We could have coordinates for a location or an address. –  Matthew Chambers Sep 4 '12 at 21:44
    
In this case is it best to have referential intergrity with another field that would specify the type of location. Or to add a check with a trigger –  Matthew Chambers Sep 4 '12 at 21:45
    
@MatthewChambers Well it sounds like you have answered your own question with regards to schema. Having a separate location table certainly makes sense in your case. The problem with referential integrity, is that it would force you to have a value for each of the address and geolocation foreign key fields. So your case where you would like to allow to have either field or both fields would not be able to be enforced since you want to be able to have NULL values in these fields. –  Mike Brant Sep 4 '12 at 21:51
    
@MatthewChambers Without using triggers, I would still suggest the unique key across both fields, and just enter a dummy location record with null for each to prevent the case of adding a new record with null-null. I am also assuming here that there is a one-to-one relationship between locations and each of addresses/geolocations. Such that you wouldn't need a second location record pointing to already-used addresses on either the address or geolocations tables. –  Mike Brant Sep 4 '12 at 21:53
    
I would like to allow null in either column but not both. If i put unique across both we could still have null null once as you mention. I think i will have to put trgger to prevent this as it seems on the only way. it is a many to many relationship. An address could have a slightly seperate geolocation/ or zoom / pitch for example. Someone may choose an address and then choose a different location for it. –  Matthew Chambers Sep 4 '12 at 22:04

If you want to make sure, that a row in the location table hast at least one of the location fields not null, I recommend to assure this by creating an ON INSERT and a corresponding ON UPDATE trigger.

The trick is to make the trigger change a field in NEW to an impossible-to-insert resp. inmpossible-to-update value, and so make the INSERT or UPDATE fail. One possibility is to force a duplicate key error, another is to force an invalid value. Something like

CREATE TRIGGER needs_some BEFORE UPDATE ON location
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
     IF (NEW.Geolocation IS NULL AND NEW.Address IS NULL) THEN
         SET NEW.Geolocation = 'ABC';
     END IF;
END;

This would fail the insert, assuming location.Geolocation is of a numeric type.

On MySQL 5.5 or newer you could simply

CREATE TRIGGER needs_some BEFORE UPDATE ON location
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
     IF (NEW.Geolocation IS NULL AND NEW.Address IS NULL) THEN
         SIGNAL SQLSTATE '99999' SET MESSAGE_TEXT='Must not be a double NULL';
     END IF;
END;

or on earlier MySQL versions

CREATE TRIGGER needs_some BEFORE UPDATE ON location
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
     IF (NEW.Geolocation IS NULL AND NEW.Address IS NULL) THEN
         CALL inexistant_stored_procedure;
     END IF;
END;

as a workaround.

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