Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here, i am trying to create a Nth level hierarchy but doesnt let me point to outer-class of an inner class and getting an access violation error. But the latter version workes.

What is my mistake? Is this about the scope of newly created inner-loops? But they are created inside the class so it shouldnt be problem should it?

 // atom.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include<iostream>
#include<stdlib.h>

class a
{
public:
    int x;
    a * inner;
    a * outer;
    a(int n)   //creates an inner a
    {
        n--;
        x=n;    
        if(n>0){inner=new a(n);}else{inner=NULL;}   
        inner->outer=this;//Unhandled exception at 0x004115ce in atom.exe: 0xC0000005:
                          //Access violation writing location 0x00000008.
    }

};

int main()
{
    a * c=new a(5);
    a * d=c;
    while((d->inner))     //would print 4321 if worked
    {
        std::cout<<d->x;
        d=d->inner;
    }
    getchar();
    delete c;
    d=NULL;
    c=NULL;
    return 0;
}

But this works:

// atom.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include<iostream>
#include<stdlib.h>

class a
{
public:
    int x;
    a * inner;
    a * outer;
    a(int n)   //creates an inner a
    {
        n--;
        x=n;    
        if(n>0){inner=new a(n);inner->outer=this;}else{inner=NULL;} 
        //works without error
    }

};

int main()
{
    a * c=new a(5);
    a * d=c;
    while((d->inner))     //prints 4321
    {
        std::cout<<d->x;
        d=d->inner;
    }
    getchar();
    delete c;
    d=NULL;
    c=NULL;
    return 0;
}

Do you think all they are auto-deletet when i just delete c ?

share|improve this question
    
What in your experience would lead to suspect this kind of auto-deletion feature? –  eq- Sep 4 '12 at 21:17
    
They start auto-destruting until they reach NULL? maybe? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 4 '12 at 21:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you do this:

if(n>0)
{
   inner=new a(n); //first n is 4, then 3,2,1 and then 0
}
else
{
   inner=NULL;
}   
inner->outer=this;

the condition n>0 will eventually not hold (at the 5th call), so inner will be NULL, and then you runt into undefined behavior (and the crash) when you attempt to dereference it (inner->outer).

share|improve this answer

This line:

inner->outer=this

needs to be inside the if (n > 0) branch, after the inner = new a(n) line, e.g.:

a(int n) : inner(0), outer(0) // set data members here
{
    x = --n;
    if (n > 0) {
        inner = new a(n);
        inner->outer = this;
    }
}

As written, when n == 0 you're guaranteed a null-pointer exception when you try to set NULL->outer = this.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 4 '12 at 21:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.