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I'm reading "Javascript: The Definitive Guide", 6E, and I came across this example:

  var cookies = (function() {
    var cookies = {};
    var all = document.cookie;
    if ( all === "" )
      return cookies;
    var list = all.split("; ");
    for ( var i = 0; i < list.length; i++ )
    {
      var cookie = list[ i ];
      var p = cookie.indexOf( "=" );
      var name = cookie.substring( 0, p );
      var value = cookie.substring( p + 1 );
      value = decodeURIComponent( value );
      cookies[ name ] = value;
    }
    return cookies;
  }());

I can see what he did here; he created a function and called it immediately. I just can't see why he might do that in this case. I've seen this idiom used in jQuery before to hide the "$" operator, but he's not hiding anything here; the only variable he creates is "cookies", and that's the var he's populating. I can't figure out how this is any different than:

var cookies = {};
var all = document.cookie;
if ( all !== "" )
{
    var list = all.split("; ");
    for ( var i = 0; i < list.length; i++ )
    {
      var cookie = list[ i ];
      var p = cookie.indexOf( "=" );
      var name = cookie.substring( 0, p );
      var value = cookie.substring( p + 1 );
      value = decodeURIComponent( value );
      cookies[ name ] = value;
    }
}

Other than the introduction of "all" in the global scope? Is there some deeper corner case he's sidestepping with this particular example that I'm just not aware of?

share|improve this question
    
In a world where sites sometimes pull in random scripts from all over, like for ads etc., global namespace pollution is kind-of a significant problem. –  Pointy Sep 4 '12 at 21:19
1  
Run the second snippet through JSLint -- you will get tons of warnings because of hoisting. Declaring vars below the first line of a function scope is misleading because they all ACT as if they were declared in the first line. –  Ed Bayiates Sep 4 '12 at 21:27
    
@AresAvatar—yes, but that is just JSLint's preference, should also occur in the first example and has nothing to do with the fundamental differences in the two. –  RobG Sep 4 '12 at 21:32
1  
@RobG, it is not just a preference. It's a warning for a good reason, as I referenced, var statements are hoisted. –  Ed Bayiates Sep 4 '12 at 21:34
    
@AresAvatar–"hoisting" is jargon for javascript processing declarations before executing code. Having variable declarations inside the block does nothing harmful, though it may confuse those who don't know javascript doesn't have block scope and is generally considered not a good idea. Both examples have the declarations in the block, singling out the second example doesn't make sense. –  RobG Sep 4 '12 at 23:18

2 Answers 2

Javascript only has two scopes: Global and Function. Unlike many languages, it has no block scope.

Therefore, your alternative code puts all, list, i, cookie, p, name, and value into whatever scope cookies is being defined in.

Now, if your snippet is inside some function definition and cookies is being returned, that might not be so bad. But if it's inside a top level script, then you're looking at a lot of very common variable names that you're dumping into the global namespace.

So, immediate functions are useful when you need the scoping limits of a function, but don't really want to have a Function object kicking around afterwards.

Edit

To expand on other advantages.

Another common use of immediate functions is for doing on time set up, often when browser sniffing is involved:

var foo = (function(browser) {

    if(isBar(browser) {
        return function() {
            /* Some implementation of foo that is compatible with bar */
        };
    } else if(isBaz(browser) {
        return function() {
            /* Some implementation of foo that is compatible with baz */
        };
    } else {
        return function() {
            /* Some generic implementation of foo  */
        };
    }
}(browser_reference));

In one shot, you've defined a browser-compatible version of foo without cluttering up your scope with variables needed to determine what the browser is.

share|improve this answer

Javascript doesn't have a concept of namespaces. But it does have a concept of scope. The example code is a way of encapsulating code and emulating namespaces.

Basically, it keeps your code from accidentally overwriting someone else's code (and vice-versa).

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