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In ASP.net Generic handler files (.ashx) Sessions are by default not enabled, the sessions collection is empty no matter what.

But by simply implementing the "ISessionHandler", sessions are suddenly accessable though the sessions collection..

I really dont understand that, becuase in my head interfaces doesnt do anything other than telling other stuff what methods, properties etc. it needs to have.

Does anyone know how that works?

Thanks in advance :)

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@Moulde: could you please tell us the full name of the interface you're referring to? Is it System.Web.ISessionHandler? – John Saunders Aug 4 '09 at 13:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

These interfaces are simply used by HttpContext. If you look at the Handler property of that in reflector, you will see the following:

 set
    {
        this._handler = value;
        this.RequiresSessionState = false;
        this.ReadOnlySessionState = false;
        this.InAspCompatMode = false;
        if (this._handler != null)
        {
            if (this._handler is IRequiresSessionState)
            {
                this.RequiresSessionState = true;
            }
            if (this._handler is IReadOnlySessionState)
            {
                this.ReadOnlySessionState = true;
            }
            Page page = this._handler as Page;
            if ((page != null) && page.IsInAspCompatMode)
            {
                this.InAspCompatMode = true;
            }
        }
    }

With the key bit being:

    if (this._handler is IReadOnlySessionState)
    {
        this.ReadOnlySessionState = true;
    }

As others have said they are marker interfaces used by HttpContext to establish what capabilities it should have.

The IHttpHandler's ProcessRequest takes in a HttpContext, hence the relationship between the two.

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These interface are I believe called Marker Interfaces, they "Mark" a purpose. Through reflection (i.e. checking if a class implements an Interface) or by chcking if class x is of type IInterface, you can enable certain functionality.

Edit: Here's some more on the subject (it's about Java, but related)

link text

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The interface isn't actually implementing anything; They probably are just checking the type and acting differently based on it.

Eg:

public ISession Session
{
    get { if (this is ISessionHandler) return theSession; else return null; }
}
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From the documentation for the IRequiresSessionState interface:

Specifies that the target HTTP handler requires read and write access to session-state values. This is a marker interface and has no methods.

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Some say Marker Interfaces are deprecated and one should use Attributes instead, but I wonder why... It's much more safe and much more elegant semantics too with Marker Interfaces and surely much more performant too than to search through the Attributes.

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I totally agree.. – Moulde Oct 16 '09 at 15:33

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