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I have a data set with several hundred columns. It contains mailing list data and several of the columns seem to be exact duplicates of each other but in different form.

For instance:

rowNum    StateCode       StateName      StateAbbreviation
  1          01             UTAH               UT
  2          01             UTAH               UT
  3          03             TEXAS              TX
  4          03             TEXAS              TX
  5          03             TEXAS              TX
  6          44             OHIO               OH
  7          44             OHIO               OH
  8          44             OHIO               OH
 ...         ...            ...                ...

I'd like to remove the overlapping data and just keep the numeric columns if possible so only one column contains the same information. Thus, the above example would become:

rowNum    StateCode
      1          01 
      2          01   
      3          03  
      4          03  
      5          03 
      6          44
      7          44
      8          44 
     ...         ...  

I've tried using cor() but this only works for numeric variables. I've tried caret::nearZeroVar() but this only works with in the column itself.

Does anyone have any suggestions for finding perfectly correlated columns involving non-numeric data?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Just edited my answer to simplify its approach. It now uses cor(), which I should of course have picked up from your question to start with. Thanks for the cool question. –  Josh O'Brien Sep 5 '12 at 3:27
    
@JoshO'Brien: Works great. Thank you very much. –  screechOwl Sep 5 '12 at 12:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's a fun and fast solution. It first converts the data.frame to an appropriately structured integer-class matrix, and then uses cor() to identify the redundant columns.

## Read in the data
df <- read.table(text="rowNum    StateCode       StateName      StateAbbreviation
  1          01             UTAH               UT
  2          01             UTAH               UT
  3          03             TEXAS              TX
  4          03             TEXAS              TX
  5          03             TEXAS              TX
  6          44             OHIO               OH
  7          44             OHIO               OH
  8          44             OHIO               OH", header=TRUE)

## Convert data.frame to a matrix with a convenient structure
## (have a look at m to see where this is headed)
l <- lapply(df, function(X) as.numeric(factor(X, levels=unique(X))))
m <- as.matrix(data.frame(l))

## Identify pairs of perfectly correlated columns    
M <- (cor(m,m)==1)
M[lower.tri(M, diag=TRUE)] <- FALSE

## Extract the names of the redundant columns
colnames(M)[colSums(M)>0]
[1] "StateName"         "StateAbbreviation"
share|improve this answer

Would this do the trick? I'm basing it off the idea that if you call table(col1, col2), any columns in the table will only have one non-zero value if the columns are duplicates, e.g.:

     OHIO TEXAS UTAH
  1     0     0    2
  3     0     3    0
  44    3     0    0

So something like this:

dup.cols <- read.table(text='rowNum    StateCode       StateName      StateAbbreviation
  1          01             UTAH               UT
  2          01             UTAH               UT
  3          03             TEXAS              TX
  4          03             TEXAS              TX
  5          03             TEXAS              TX
  6          44             OHIO               OH
  7          44             OHIO               OH
  8          44             OHIO               OH', header=T)
library(plyr)
combs <- combn(ncol(dup.cols), 2)
adply(combs, 2, function(x) {
  t <- table(dup.cols[ ,x[1]], dup.cols[ , x[2]])
  if (all(aaply(t1, 2, function(x) {sum(x != 0) == 1}))) {
    paste("Column numbers ", x[1], x[2], "are duplicates")
  }
})
share|improve this answer

This should return for you a map telling you which variables match each other.

check.dup <- expand.grid(names(dat),names(dat)) #find all variable pairs
check.dup[check.dup$Var1 != check.dup$Var2,] #take out self-reference
check.dup$id <- mapply(function(x,y) {
        x <- as.character(x); y <- as.character(y)
            #if number of levels is different, discard; keep the number for later
        if ((n <- length(unique(dat[,x]))) != length(unique(dat[,y])))  {
            return(FALSE)
            }
            #subset just the variables in question to get pairs
        d <- dat[,c(x,y)]
            #find unique pairs
        d <- unique(d)
            #if number of unique pairs is the number of levels from before,
            #then the pairings are one-to-one
        if( nrow(d) == n ) {
            return(TRUE)
        } else return(FALSE)
    },
    check.dup$Var1,
    check.dup$Var2
)
share|improve this answer
 dat <- read.table(text="rowNum    StateCode       StateName     
   1          01             UTAH
   2          01             UTAH
   3          03             TEXAS
   4          03             TEXAS 
   5          03             TEXAS 
   6          44             OHIO
   7          44             OHIO
   8          44             OHIO", header=TRUE)

 dat [!duplicated(dat[, 2:3]), ]
#------------
  rowNum StateCode StateName
1      1         1      UTAH
3      3         3     TEXAS
6      6        44      OHIO
share|improve this answer
    
The question was asking about duplicate columns, not rows. –  Marius Sep 4 '12 at 22:52
    
@Marius: If you are the source of the -1 vote, let me ask you if you think it reasonable to downvote an answer after the OP has changed the question to be something else than what it started out? When I posted this answer there was no "StateAbbreviation" column and there was no "correct answer" example in the question. I'm not worried about my points total but I think it's poor citizenship to downvote when the questions are changing. –  BondedDust Sep 4 '12 at 23:14
    
I agree -- a downvote here serves no useful purpose, and just makes SO a less friendly place. –  Josh O'Brien Sep 4 '12 at 23:42
    
Sorry, I thought it was an answer based on a skim read of the question ("find duplicates!"). I didn't realize it was posted pre-edit. –  Marius Sep 5 '12 at 0:19

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