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I currently have the following code:

float a[4] = { 10, 20, 30, 40 };
float b[4] = { 0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1 };
asm volatile("movups (%0), %%xmm0\n\t"
             "mulps (%1), %%xmm0\n\t"             
             "movups %%xmm0, (%1)"             
             :: "r" (a), "r" (b));

I have first of all a few questions:

(1) if i WERE to align the arrays on 16 byte boundaries, would it even work? Since the arrays are allocated on the stack is it true that aligning them is near impossible?

see the selected answer for this post: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/841433/gcc-attributealignedx-explanation

(2) Could the code be refactored at all to make it more efficient? What if I put both float arrays in registers rather than just one?

Thanks

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

if i WAS to align the arrays on 16 byte boundaries, would it even work? Since the arrays are allocated on the stack is it true that aligning them is near impossible?

It is required that alignment on the stack works. Otherwise intrinsics would not work. I would guess the post you quoted had to do with the exorbitant value he selected for the alignment value.

to 2:

No, there shouldn't be a difference in performance. See this site for the instruction timings of several processors.


How alignment of stack variables works :

push	ebp
mov	ebp, esp
and	esp, -16				; fffffff0H
sub	esp, 200				; 000000c8H

The and aligns the begin of the stack to 16 byte.

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Using intrinsic is much faster especially with optimization. I wrote simple test and compare both version (asm and intrinsic)

unsigned long long time1;
__m128 a1,b1;


a1=_mm_set_ps(10, 20,30,40);
b1=_mm_set_ps(0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1);
float a[4] = { 10, 20, 30, 40 };
float b[4] = { 0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1 };

time1=__rdtsc();
a1=_mm_mul_ps(a1,b1);
time1=__rdtsc() - time1 ;
printf("Time: %llu\n",time1);


time1=__rdtsc();
asm volatile("movups (%0), %%xmm0\n\t"
                 "mulps (%1), %%xmm0\n\t"
                 "movups %%xmm0, (%1)"
                 :: "r" (a), "r" (b));
time1=__rdtsc() - time1 ;
printf("Time: %llu\n",time1);

Intrinsic version 50-60 processor timestamps Asm Version ~1000 proc timestamps

You can test it on your machine

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About refactoring. You can use intrinsic. Example:

#include <emmintrin.h>

int main(void)
{
    __m128 a1,b1;

    a1=_mm_set_ps(10, 20,30,40);
    b1=_mm_set_ps(0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1);

    a1=_mm_mul_ps(a1,b1);

    return 0;
}

With optimization gcc (-O2 , -O3) it may be work faster then asm.

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how much faster do you reckon it would run? could you benchmark? –  toxicate20 Nov 23 '12 at 8:08
    
see next post , i'm test it –  AlekseyM Nov 23 '12 at 8:54

Does GCC provide support for the __m128 data type? If so that's your best plan for guaranteeing a 16 byte aligned data type. Nonetheless there is __attribute__((aligned(16))) for aligning things. Define your arrays as follows

float a[4] __attribute__((aligned(16))) = { 10, 20, 30, 40 };
float b[4] __attribute__((aligned(16))) = { 0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1 };

and then use movaps instead :)

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wow those "__"s really screw up the formatting. Anyone know how to fix that? –  Goz Aug 4 '09 at 12:40
    
thanks; but as stated in this article stackoverflow.com/questions/841433/… it seems impossible to align arrays that are allocated on the stack? (as opposed to global arrays allocated in .data) –  banister Aug 4 '09 at 12:44
    
@Goz, yes - use inline code blocks (backticks) –  Dominic Rodger Aug 4 '09 at 12:48
    
thanks for the fix Bastien :) Banister ... can you give it a try and see what happens? If that linked to explanation is right then it would be impossible to align things like double correctly, yet they DO get aligned. –  Goz Aug 4 '09 at 12:55
    
yes i will soon...I have a feeling the linked explanation is wrong, as everyone in this question seems to imply. thanks everyone! :) –  banister Aug 4 '09 at 12:58

Write it in C, use

gcc -S -mssse3

if you have a fairly recent version of gcc.

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what C code would compile to those sse instructions? do you have an example? –  banister Aug 4 '09 at 13:01
1  
float a[4] = { 10, 20, 30, 40 }; float b[4] = { 0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.1 }; int foo(void) { int i; for (i=0; i < 4; i++) a[i] *= b[i]; } Compile as shown and examine the .s file. –  xcramps Aug 4 '09 at 13:10
    
interesting, thanks! –  banister Aug 4 '09 at 13:12

(1) if i WAS to align the arrays on 16 byte boundaries, would it even work? Since the arrays are allocated on the stack is it true that aligning them is near impossible?

No, it's quite simple to align the stack pointer using and:

and esp, 0xFFFFFFF0 ; aligned on a 16-byte boundary

But you should use what GCC provides, such as a 16 bytes type, or __attribute__ to customize alignment.

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thanks for your answer, would you be able to explain to me how you can use 'and' for alignment? i dont quite 'get' it :) –  banister Aug 5 '09 at 16:33
1  
Recall that some_bit and 0 = 0 and a/16 = a>>4 if a is unsigned. Using and like this will set the four least significant bits to zero, and leave the others unchanged. What happens if you divide esp by 16, actually? It gets right-shifted by 4, and the four “lost” bits are the remainder. Thus those four bits should be 0, so that esp is divisible by 16. What really happens is that it subtracts at most 15, so that esp % 16 == 0. (Subtracting from esp means allocating more space on the stack). –  Bastien Léonard Aug 5 '09 at 16:56

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