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Suppose I have an object with a strong reference to a block. Sometime during the execution of that block, the strong reference is set to nil. Is the block guaranteed to finish its execution, or can this cause a crash? I've seen exc-bad-access errors, but I can't produce them reliably, so I don't know exactly why they pop up.

For example:

-(void)method
{
    self.block = ^{
        //code
        self.block = nil;
        //more code - crash here?
    }
}

-(void)otherMethod
{
    block();
}
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1  
I think you're worrying needlessly here. Blocks are Objective-C objects. A block should not only retain reference to objects it uses, but the block itself is managed through ARC. If it's being called, a reference exists to itself. –  Steven Fisher Sep 5 '12 at 6:22
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3 Answers

The documents don't seem to guarantee that a block will be retained while it is executing. Conversely, the documentation for GCD calls such as dispatch_async does make such guarantees. From that it would seem you can't assume that an ordinary call into a block will retain it.

So in your code you probably want:

-(void)otherMethod
{
    dispatch_block_t localBlock = Block_copy(block);
    localBlock();
    Block_release(localBlock);
}
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What about in ARC? Is it possible that calling a block creates a strong reference in the local scope? –  Aaron Sep 5 '12 at 18:10
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When a method that executes a block doesn't first check if there's still a reference to a block, a crash can occur. You might have had those crashes in methods were a check like this was missing.

- (void)methodWithBlock:(void (^)(void))block
{
   if (block) // this check is to prevent crashes when calling to a released block pointer ...
   {
      block();
   }
}

You might have encountered code where such a check was missing which might have resulted in the crashes you've experienced. I've certainly experienced the same.

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Well, that's not quite what I meant. In my scenario, the block is already in the middle of execution when the reference to that block is set to nil. In your scenario, the problem is when you try to start execution of a nil block. –  Aaron Sep 5 '12 at 0:11
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe I finally have a satisfactory answer to this question. Note that this is all in the context of ARC.

A block can become deallocated during its execution. The block will continue executing as normal, but any of its pointers to captured variables become suspect (and potentially dangerous).

Suppose ObjectA has a block copy property named completion:

@property (nonatomic, copy) void (^completion)();

...where the assignment looks something like this:

__weak ObjectA * weakSelf = self;
self.completion = ^{
    weakSelf.completion = nil;
    [weakSelf doSomethingElse];
};

If the block is called like so...

-(void)method
{
    _completion(); //directly uses ObjectA's instance of the block
}

...then, assuming nothing else has a reference to this instance of the block, it becomes deallocated and its captured variable weakSelf becomes nil. doSomethingElse is never called. The best way to get around this is to simply invoke the block by using its accessor - this will allocate a new copy on the stack. The original will be deallocated, but the new copy and all of its captured variables will survive the current context.

-(void)method
{
    self.completion(); //uses new copy of the block
}
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