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I'm developing a WinForm application and I've done a pretty bad job thus far of managing the size and contents. I was hoping someone could give me an example of how to break out some of the logic that I have within the main form cs file.

Here is an example of an EventHandler function that I have within my MainWindow.cs:

    private void GroupBoxRequestTypeCheckedChanged(object pSender, EventArgs pEventArgs)
    {
        RadioButton vRadioButton = pSender as RadioButton;

        if (vRadioButton != null)
        {
            this.fSelectedButton = vRadioButton.Checked ? vRadioButton : null;

            if (vRadioButton.Equals(this.RadioButton_Copy) || vRadioButton.Equals(this.RadioButton_Delete) || vRadioButton.Equals(this.RadioButton_Download)
                || vRadioButton.Equals(this.RadioButton_Move) || vRadioButton.Equals(this.RadioButton_Upload))
            {
                this.GroupBox_Files.Enabled = true;
                this.GroupBox_Variables.Enabled = false;
            }
            else
            {
                this.GroupBox_Files.Enabled = false;
                this.GroupBox_Variables.Enabled = true;
            }
            if (this.fSelectedButton != null)
            {
                if (this.fSelectedButton.Equals(this.RadioButton_Delete))
                {
                    this.TextBox_DestinationFile.Enabled = false;
                    this.Button_DestinationBrowse.Enabled = false;
                }
                else
                {
                    this.TextBox_DestinationFile.Enabled = true;
                    this.Button_DestinationBrowse.Enabled = true;
                }
            }
        }
    }

So this is simply one of many EventHandler's that I have within a Form. I created a MainForm which has a Tabbed Pane and has a collection of Tabs which have buttons, textboxes, checkboxes etc in each tab. All of the events that I handle go into the MainForm.cs file and now I've got close to 1,000 lines in this one file.

Can someone give me a simple example (or a article/document) detailing good structure? Can I define my EventHandler functions in a separate class (if so, how would this work...) Do I create some sort of static Helper class where I simply pass the instance of the objects i need to manipulate? I.E.

    private void GroupBoxRequestTypeCheckedChange(object pSender, EventArgs pEventArgs)
    {
        HelperClass.HandleGroupBoxRequestTypeCheckedChanged(pSender, pEventArgs, this);
    }

Where 'this' is the Form itself which has all the references to the objects I need to manipulate?

It's probably worth noting that I've learned a good bit about the Cross-Thread calls and I've started making Extension methods for many instances that I need which are simplistic.

Another question - I notice that the Visual Designer automatically makes all Components created with it private by default, is it in general a bad idea to make these internal and use the form object to reference these components as needed from outside the class? If it is not a good idea, what is better?

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1  
I've spent the last month untangling an entire app like this for a customer. Hell on wheels. You are right to look to refactor. If you have tabs then you immediately have a logical place to break out your code. Considerusing UserControls for each tab. –  tcarvin Sep 5 '12 at 2:06
    
@tcarvin - I haven't used UserControls yet at all - Would the Tab itself be a UserControl or would I go as far as breaking out each individual Tab as a UserControl? –  Tada Sep 5 '12 at 2:50
1  
Usercontrols are a good way to make your MainWindow.cs smaller and slight. You can do everything within these controls what you could do in the "normal" Form and you can reuse them, if it takes need that some kind of controls needs to be shown up more than one time. Anyway, each tab itself would be an usercontrol. You can setup a Method in MainWindow.cs to load all required usercontrols on startup in the tabcontrol/tabpane. –  varg Sep 5 '12 at 8:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First I would suggest to separate independent user-interface parts into UserControls or Components. Then - if needed - wire them using Events (eg. your own specialized events and properties.

For example you can place your main content (the TabControl / Container) in a UserControl and place that user control in the main form. All tab-/page-switching logic/UI etc. then belongs to that user control. In that UserControl you can define for example your own Event that gets fired when the user switches a tab. The main form then can register to this event - just like it can for other Winforms-control-events - and do its stuff (eg. change the window title to represent the currently active tab).

Then next you can move the content of each tab to its own user-control and use these user-controls within your new tabs-usercontrol. Move the logic down to the UserControl which is responsible for the given task.

A form/controls hierarchy from some typical application could look like this:

  • MainForm (Form)
    • MainTabContainerControl (UserControl)
    • Page1Control (UserControl)
    • Page2Control (UserControl)
      • MyImprovedDbRowGridControl (UserControl or Component)
    • Page3Control (UserControl)
    • SidebarControl (UserControl)
    • SearchControl (UserControl)
      • MyImprovedDbRowGridControl (UserControl or Component)
    • QuickHelpControl (UserControl)

Next thing is so keep all the UI-eventhandlers as small as possible and doing only UI stuff. Move other logic like business- or dataaccess-logic to other classes outside of the user-interface.

If you have combinations of the controls that are needed more then once in the application: move them to a re-usable UserControl. (eg. breadcrum).

Regarding your sample code you can make it more compact and therefore maintainable by simplyfing its logic:

if (this.fSelectedButton.Equals(this.RadioButton_Delete))
{
    this.TextBox_DestinationFile.Enabled = false;
    this.Button_DestinationBrowse.Enabled = false;
}
else
{
    this.TextBox_DestinationFile.Enabled = true;
    this.Button_DestinationBrowse.Enabled = true;
}

...could be:

    var delete = fSelectedButton == RadioButton_Delete;
    this.TextBox_DestinationFile.Enabled = !delete;
    this.Button_DestinationBrowse.Enabled = !delete;

Update: When it comes to refactoring and code-cleanup a very usefull tool is Resharper (R#). I can highly recommend it.

Hope this gives you some ideas where to start.

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1  
Marc - That's for your detailed explanation. Later last night after posting this I began playing with UserControls and instantly saw the power it held for me. I've been using the Visual Designer a lot as I switched to C# recently and I think that held me back from learning some of the great things about UserControls. Resharper is amazing, I've learned more using ReSharper over the past 4 months than I have from any book just from it's recommendations! Great Tip! –  Tada Sep 5 '12 at 12:41

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