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How do I write an Oracle trigger, than when a user deletes a certain record, the delete doesnt actually happen, but instead performs an update on those rows and sets the status of the record to 'D'?

I tried:

create or replace
trigger DELFOUR.T4M_ITEM_ONDELETE
before delete on M_ITEM_H
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
  UPDATE
    M_ITEM_H
  SET
    ITEM_STAT = 'D'
  WHERE
    CUST_CODE = 'TEST'
    AND ITEM_CODE = 'GDAY'
  ;

  raise_application_error(-20000,'Cannot delete item');
END;

But I am getting mutating table errors. Is this possible?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all the trigger you wrote would throw a mutating table error. Technically what you are asking is not possible i.e. delete wouldn't delete but rather update, unless you raise an exception in the middle which could be an ugly way of doing it. I would think users using some sort of application front end which lets them delete data using a delete button, so you may use an update statement there instead of a delete statement.

Another option would be to create a log table, where you could insert the record before deleting it from the actual table and then join the log table with the actual table to retrieve deleted records. Something like-

 CRETAE TABLE M_ITEM_H_DEL_LOG as SELECT * FROM M_ITEM_H WHERE 1=2;

And then

create or replace
trigger DELFOUR.T4M_ITEM_ONDELETE
before delete on M_ITEM_H
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
  INSERT INTO
    M_ITEM_H_DEL_LOG
  VALUES (:old.col1, :old.col2,.....) --col1, col2...are columns in M_ITEM_H
  ;
END;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the that! I do not have access to the application. Basically, its a Warehouse Management System that will delete an Item code if there has not been any movements for this product. If there has, it simply deactivates the item. I want it to always deactivate the item. The interface is using Oracle Forms so it is very ugly as it is, so I am not to worried if the user see's an oracle error, as the current application is scattered with them. –  Lock Sep 5 '12 at 2:29
    
If u can change the oracle forms code to change the delete button feature you can do that. Or else instead of 'Cannot delete item' message say something like 'Item deleted/deactivated' in the raise_application_error. –  Annjawn Sep 5 '12 at 2:42
    
But beware of the mutating table error. –  Annjawn Sep 5 '12 at 2:48
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If you really need a trigger, the more logical approach would be to create a view, create an INSEAD OF DELETE trigger on the view, and to force the applications to issue their deletes against the view rather than against the base table.

CREATE VIEW vw_m_item_h
AS
SELECT *
  FROM m_item_h;

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER t4m_item_ondelete
  INSTEAD OF DELETE ON vw_m_item_h
  FOR EACH ROW
AS
BEGIN
  UPDATE m_item_h
     SET item_stat = 'D'
   WHERE <<primary key>> = :old.<<primary key>>;
END;

Better yet, you would dispense with the trigger, create a delete_item procedure that your application would call rather than issuing a DELETE and that procedure would simply update the row to set the item_stat column rather than deleting the row.

If you really, really, really want a solution that involves a trigger on the table itself, you could

  1. Create a package with a member that is a collection of records that map to the data in the m_item_h table
  2. Create a before delete statement-level trigger that empties this collection
  3. Create a before delete row-level trigger that inserts the :old.<<primary key>> and all the other :old values into the collection
  4. Create an after delete statement-level trigger that iterates through the collection, re-inserts the rows into the table, and sets the item_stat column.

This would involve more work than an instead of trigger since you'd have to delete and then re-insert the row and it would involve way more moving pieces so it would be much less elegant. But it would work.

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Unfortunately I have no access to the application so cannot change this –  Lock Sep 5 '12 at 2:32
1  
@Lock - Are you saying this is a third-party packaged application? If so, why would you be able to modify it by adding a trigger in the first place? –  Justin Cave Sep 5 '12 at 2:40
    
Because I have sysdba access to the database –  Lock Sep 5 '12 at 7:31
1  
@Lock - If this is a third-party packaged application, the vendor would generally not allow you to add triggers to the system in the first place. You might technically have access to the system to be able to add a trigger. But doing so would, among other things, violate your support contract. If you don't care about violating the support contract, I'd go back to creating a view. You can rename the table, create a view with the name of the table, and create INSTEAD OF triggers on the view. That will generally be transparent to the application. –  Justin Cave Sep 5 '12 at 13:42
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